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www2.illinois.gov

income tax filing & payment extension Gov. Pritzker announced today that the state is extending the income tax filing and payment deadline by three months, from April 15 to July 15. The Department of Revenue (IDOR) will continue to process tax refunds for those filing ahead of the new deadline.

wglc.net

SPRINGFIELD — Gov. Pritzker announced that his administration is extending the individual income tax filing and payment deadline from April 15 to May 17. The Illinois Department of Revenue will continue to process tax refunds for those. ... Illinois Income Tax Filing Deadline Extended to May 17. March 28, 2021 Local Headlines, ...

studstillmedia.com

SPRINGFIELD — Gov. Pritzker announced that his administration is extending the individual income tax filing and payment deadline from April 15 to May 17. The Illinois Department of Revenue will continue to process tax refunds for those filing ahead of the deadline.

People also ask
  • When is the Illinois state tax return deadline?

    Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Illinois State Tax Return deadline has changed from April 15 to July 15, 2020. Illinois State Income Taxes for Tax Year 2019 (January 1 - Dec. 31, 2019) can be prepared and e-Filed now along with an IRS or Federal Income Tax Return. Federal Tax Return deadline details.
    Illinois State Taxes and Income Tax Forms
  • When do I have to file Form il-505-i?

    If you determine that you will owe tax, you must file Form IL-505-I, Automatic Extension Payment for individuals, to pay any tax you owe to avoid penalty and interest on tax not paid by the original due date. For tax year 2020, the filing deadline for Illinois income tax returns has been extended from April 15, 2021 to May 17, 2021.
    When is my individual income tax return due?
  • Is Illinois extending the 2019 tax year filing and payment due date?

    However, in response to questions from practitioners, the department has informally made the following clarifications: Illinois is extending the 2019 tax year filing and payment due date for C corporations who file Form IL-1120 from April 15, 2020 to July 15, 2020.

    The Illinois Department of Revenue announced in Informational Bulletin FY 2020-24 (“Bulletin 2020-24”) that the tax filing and income tax payment deadlines for 2019 “individual returns, trusts, and corporations” were being automatically extended from April 15, 2020 to July 15, 2020. 

    The department has not yet formally confirmed whether the July 15, 2020 deadline for filing and paying tax also applies to either replacement tax or pass-through withholding tax, given that the language of Bulletin 2020-24 refers exclusively to “income tax” payments.  However, in response to questions from practitioners, the department has informally made the following clarifications:

    • Illinois is extending the 2019 tax year filing and payment due date for C corporations who file Form IL-1120 from April 15, 2020 to July 15, 2020.
    • Illinois is not extending the filing or payment due dates for tax year 2019 returns for partnerships, including nonresident withholding (Form IL-1065), which still falls on April 15, 2020.
    • Illinois is not extending the due date of an already extended income tax return tax return and payment for fiscal year taxpayers whose extended due date would otherwise be April 15, 2020 must still file and pay on that date).

    Illinois’ 2020 quarterly estimated tax payment

    Bulletin 2020-24 explains that its’ relief “does NOT impact the first and second installments of estimated payments for 2020 taxes that are due April 15 and June 15.”

    On April 2, 2020 Illinois published Informational Bulletin FY 2020-26 (“Bulletin 2020-26”) to explain the relief that Illinois would provide.

    In Bulletin 2020-26, Illinois authorized taxpayers to base their 2020 estimated tax payments upon 100% of the taxpayers’ estimated 2020 liability or 100% of their actual 2018 or 2019 liability. 

    In addition, taxpayers who timely pay in four equal installments  will avoid late payment penalties if they base their installments upon the lesser of (1) 90% of their 2020 estimated liability or (2) 100% of their actual 2018 or 2019 liability.

    • Calculating 2020 quarterly estimates based on 100% of 2018 liability for taxpayers who have not filed for 2019

    According to Bulletin 2020-26, individuals who want to compute their 2020 estimated tax payments using 100% of their 2018 liability should use Form IL-1040-ES and base their 2020 estimated tax on the amount of tax they owed on 2018 Form IL-1040.

    Businesses who want to compute their 2020 estimated tax payments using 100% of their 2018 liability should use the Form IL-1120 instructions, Appendix B, or IL-990-T instructions, Appendix A, to calculate their estimated payment amount and base their 2020 estimated tax on the amount of tax they owed on their 2018 return.

    Taxpayers who wish to base their 2020 Illinois quarterly estimates upon 100% of their 2018 or 2019 liability should keep in mind that their expected 2020 payroll tax withholdings should be netted against their gross tax liability in order to compute the quarterly estimates.

    • Applying 2019 overpayments towards 2020 quarterly estimated taxes

    Many Illinois taxpayers and practitioners have asked whether they could defer payment of their Illinois 2020 Q1 or Q2 estimates until July 15 by overpaying their Illinois extension payment on July 15, 2020, and retroactively applying that overpayment back to the April 15 and June 15 estimates in a way that would cause those estimates to have been timely paid. According to Bulletin 2020-26, however, overpayments shown on a 2019 return filed on July 15, 2020 will not be considered timely applied to a taxpayer’s 2020 Q1 or Q2 estimates to the extent the overpayment was comprised of payments received after April 15, 2020.

    What’s next

    Illinois is one of a minority of states who that has not followed the IRS’ approach of extending the due date of 2020 Q1 estimates to July 15, 2020.  In addition, its’ guidance regarding allowances for computing 2020 quarterly estimates was published less than two weeks before the due date of Illinois’ Q1 2020 estimate.  Even though this combination of factors is sure to raise questions, the department is unlikely to significantly clarify these issues prior to April 15. 

    With the April 15, 2020 deadline coming up soon for all taxpayers’ 2020 Q1 estimates, as well as for the 2019 returns for partnerships, taxpayers should consult with their Wipfli tax advisor to evaluate the best approach for filing and paying these taxes.

    Related content:

    Illinois taxes deadlines extended due to COVID-19
  • When is the deadline to file your taxes?

    April 15 is a day that many Americans dread, as it represents the traditional deadline day for individuals to file their state and federal income tax returns. 2022 Tax Day is closing in — and for many, it's a day focused on two things: Deadlines, and refunds.

    2022 Tax Day is closing in — and for many, it's a day focused on two things: Deadlines, and refunds.

    This year, the filing date is later than usual.

    Here's what you need to know about the 2022 tax deadline, and tax refunds this year.

    While most Americans will have filed their taxes prior to Tax Day — which generally falls on April 15 — that isn’t the deadline for filing this year.

    Instead, the vast majority of Americans will have to file their taxes by Monday, April 18.

    The date change is due Emancipation Day, a holiday observed in Washington D.C. marking the freeing of slaves, that is celebrated on April 16.

    Federal employees are given the day off, including at the Internal Revenue Service.

    This year, April 16 falls on a Saturday, meaning that the nearest weekday is on the 15th of the month.

    As a result, the deadline for tax filing is pushed forward to April 18.

    According to the IRS, one out of 10 refunds is issued in less than 21 days.

    As of the week ending April 1, the IRS has sent out more than 63 million refunds worth over 4 billion.

    2022 Tax Day: When Will You Get Your Refund? Here's What to Know

    The average refund is ,226, according to the IRS.

    The Illinois Department of Revenue said "in addition to free filing of Form IL-1040 through MyTax Illinois, individuals may also utilize the site to make payments, respond to department inquiries, and check the status of their refunds using the Where's My Refund? link."

    Taxpaers can also calling the automated refund hotline at 1-800-829-1954.

    "Where's My Refund?" can be used to check the status of a tax return within 24 hours after an e-file acceptance notification is received.

    The “Where’s My Refund?” tool is updated only once every 24 hours. If it's been more than 21 days since a tax return was e-filed or more than six weeks since mailing a return, taxpayers can call a tax help hotline to talk to a representative.

    The IRS says it "continues to make progress in this area and has taken numerous steps to help address this issue."

    If you are still awaiting a 2020 tax return, you do not need to wait for it to be fully processed in order to file your 2021 taxes.

    According to the IRS, those with unprocessed 2020 tax returns, should enter

  • (zero dollars) for last year's AGI on their 2021 tax return when electronically filing.

    Are you eligible for an earned income tax credit? If you weren't last year, that may have changed.

    Under new guidelines, more people without children qualify to receive the federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), the federal government's largest refundable tax credit for low- to moderate-income families, according to the Internal Revenue Service.

    The tax claim could help taxpayers get an even bigger return, but according to the Illinois Department of Revenue, many Illinois residents are missing out.

    The EITC and its Illinois counterpart, the Illinois Earned Income Credit (EIC), could bring bigger returns for eligible filers. But you'll need to claim it on your tax return in order to see the benefits.

    In a change from past years, the federal credit is now available to more younger workers and senior citizens without children. To qualify, workers must be at least 19 years old and older than 64, according to the IRS. Previously, the credit for those with no dependents was only available for people age 25 to 64.

    To find out if your family qualifies for the credit, click here.

    Millions of Americans who have never filed a tax return will need to do so this year in order to claim what's coming to them under the enhanced child tax credit.

    Previously, only people who earned enough money to owe income taxes could qualify for the full credit.

    But as part of the

  • .9 trillion coronavirus relief package, President Joe Biden expanded the program, increasing the payments to up to ,600 annually for each child aged 5 or under and ,000 for those who are ages 6 to 17.

    The monthly payments have amounted to 0 for each child 5 and younger and 0 for those between 5 and 17.

    The government began to send the payments out — an overall billion — on a monthly basis starting last July. Now, there are an additional six months' worth of payments waiting to be claimed. And some families haven't collected any of the benefits they're due yet. In all, an estimated 3 billion is yet to be claimed.

    The only way to receive that money is to file a tax return.

    Here are some questions and answers about who's eligible for the credit and how to get it.

    The IDR said it plans to extend its phone hours on April 15 from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. and on April 18 from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. to help answer residents' questions.

    For the most up-to-date information, forms, schedules, and instructions for the 2022 tax season, residents can check tax.illinois.gov.

    Here are some recommendations from the IRS:

    File electronically. Taxpayers can use their computer, smartphone or tablet to file their taxes electronically, whether through IRS Free File or other e-file service providers, to help reduce mistakes. Tax software guides people through each section of their tax return using a question-and-answer format. Enter information carefully. This includes any information needed to calculate credits and deductions. Using tax software should help prevent math errors, but taxpayers should always review their tax return for accuracy.

    Use the correct filing status. Tax software, including IRS Free File, also helps prevent mistakes when selecting a tax return filing status. If taxpayers are unsure about their filing status, the Interactive Tax Assistant on IRS.gov can help them choose the correct status, especially if more than one filing status applies.

    Answer the virtual currency question. The 2021 Form 1040 and 1040-SR asks whether at any time during 2021, a person received, sold, exchanged or otherwise disposed of any financial interest in any virtual currency. Taxpayers should not leave this field blank but should check either “Yes” or “No.”

    Report all taxable income. Underreporting income may lead to penalties and interest. Organized tax records help avoid errors that lead to processing delays and may also help to find overlooked deductions or credits. Taxpayers should have all their income documents on hand before starting their tax return. Examples are Forms W-2, 1099-MISC or 1099-NEC.

    Include unemployment compensation. The IRS is seeing situations where people are not including unemployment compensation they received in 2021 on their tax returns. Although a special law allowed taxpayers to exclude unemployment compensation from taxes in 2020, it was only for that year. Unemployment compensation received in 2021 is generally taxable, so taxpayers should include it as income on their tax return.

    Double-check name, birth date and Social Security number entries. Taxpayers must correctly list the name, Social Security number (SSN) and date of birth for each person they claim as a dependent on their individual income tax return. Enter each SSN and individual’s name on a tax return exactly as printed on the Social Security card. If a dependent or spouse does not have and is not eligible to get a SSN, list the Individual Tax Identification Number (ITIN) instead of a SSN.

    Double check routing and account numbers. Requesting direct deposit of a federal refund into one, two or even three accounts is convenient and allows the taxpayer access to their money faster. Make sure the financial institution routing and account numbers entered on the return are accurate. Incorrect numbers can cause a refund to be delayed or deposited into the wrong account. Taxpayers can also use their refund to purchase U.S. Savings Bonds.

    Mail paper returns to the right address. Paper filers should confirm the correct address for where to file on IRS.gov or on form instructions to avoid processing delays. Note that processing paper tax returns could take much longer than usual. Taxpayers and tax professionals are encouraged to file electronically if possible.

    Sign and date the return. If filing a joint return, both spouses must sign and date the return. E-filers can sign using a self-selected personal identification number (PIN). Taxpayers should review the special instructions to validate their 2021 electronic tax return if their 2020 return has not yet been processed.

    Keep a copy. When ready to file, taxpayers should make a copy of their signed return and all schedules for their records.

    Request an extension, if needed. Taxpayers who cannot meet the April 18 deadline can easily request a six-month filing extension to Oct. 17 and prevent late filing penalties. Use Free File or Form 4868. But keep in mind that, while an extension grants additional time to file, tax payments are still due April 18 for most taxpayers.

2022 Tax Day: What to Know About This Year’s Tax Deadline
classichits106.com

The Illinois Department of Revenue will continue to process tax refunds for those filing ahead of the deadline. The filing extension does not apply to …

www2.illinois.gov

These extensions do not grant you an extension of time to pay any tax you owe. If you determine that you will owe tax, you must use Form IL-505-I, Automatic Extension Payment for Individuals, to pay any tax you owe to avoid penalty and interest on tax not paid by April 18, 2022. MyTax Illinois is an easy way to pay your IL-505-I payment. If you do not expect to owe tax, …

www2.illinois.gov

The due date for calendar year filers is April 15 of the year following the tax year of your return, unless April 15 falls on a weekend or holiday. We grant an automatic six-month extension of time to file your return. If you receive a federal extension of more than six months, you are automatically allowed that extension for Illinois.

tax.illinois.gov

The Illinois Department of Revenue is taking proactive measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19. At this time, a limited number of taxpayer phone system agents are available. Due to the reduced number of agents taking calls, wait times may be longer than normal. Taxpayers can save time and avoid the wait by contacting the department by email.

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Income Tax Deadline: What Last-Minute Illinois Filers Need ...

April 11, 2022, 9:37 AM · 6 min read. ILLINOIS — Some 91 million Americans have filed their 2021 income tax returns as the April 18filing deadline in Illinois approaches, about 2.1 percent fewer than at this time last year, according to the Internal Revenue Service. Taxpayers have three extra days to file their tax returns this year.

ILLINOIS — Some 91 million Americans have filed their 2021 income tax returns as the April 18filing deadline in Illinois approaches, about 2.1 percent fewer than at this time last year, according to the Internal Revenue Service.

Taxpayers have three extra days to file their tax returns this year. April 15 is traditionally Tax Day, but the Emancipation Day holiday in the District of Columbia is observed on that day. Holidays in Washington, D.C., by law affect the tax deadlines for all Americans, as other federal holidays do.

Maryland and Massachusetts residents have an additional day to get their taxes done due to the Patriots’ Day holiday observed on April 18.

The deadline for Illinois 2021 state income tax returns is also April 18. That’s the case in all but a handful of states — Delaware, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, and Virginia — that set different deadlines.

The Illinois Department of Revenue announced earlier this year that while the deadline for filing for most residents will remain on April 18, those affected by the tornadoes in December will have until May 16 to get their filings completed.

Taxpayers who have filed are, on average, receiving larger refunds, according to the IRS. Refunds are running about ,226 on average this year — about 3 more than last year, for an 11.5 percent increase. So far, the IRS has paid out about 4 billion in refunds.

If you haven’t filed yet, here are seven things to know:

1. File Your Taxes Electronically

For folks who aren’t familiar with the process, file returns electronically if possible to get refunds more quickly. Taxpayers can use their computers, smartphones, and tablets, whether through IRS Free File, offered to taxpayers earning ,000 or less, or other e-file income tax providers.

Tax software guides people through each section of their tax return using a question-and-answer format. Enter information carefully. This includes any information needed to calculate credits and deductions. Using tax software should help prevent math errors, but taxpayers should always review their tax returns for accuracy, the IRS says.

2. You May Be Eligible For A Recovery Rebate Credit

People who missed a COVID-19 stimulus payment or didn’t get the full amount may be able to claim a recovery rebate credit on their 2021 federal tax return.

Parents of a child born or adopted in 2021, as well as those who fostered children last year, may be able to receive up to

,400 per child. It can also be applied if an adult became a qualifying relative, such as a parent, nephew, niece, or grandchild became a qualifying relative in 2021 but had not previously been listed as one on tax returns.

Others who can claim the

,400 credit include people who saw their income drop in 2021. That includes:

  • Single filers who earned at least ,000 in 2020, but less in 2021;

  • Married couples filing a joining return whose combined incomes were more than 0,000, but less in 2021;

  • Head of household filers who had incomes above 0,000 but less in 2021.

3. Advance Child Care Credit Causes Confusion

The IRS says it is seeing confusion about how the advance child care tax credit — in effect, an advance on their refunds — applies to their individual situations.

The tax credits, part of President Joe Biden's

.9 trillion coronavirus relief program, increased payments to up to ,600 annually for each child age 5 or younger, and ,000 for those 6-17. Monthly, that amounted to between 0 and 0 per child.

  • Read more: How The Child Tax Credit May Affect 2022 Refund

Families whose adjusted gross income was at 0,000 or below for married couples (or ,000 for single-filer parents) are eligible for the credit.

To get all or the rest of the money due from the tax credit, parents need to file an income tax return — even if they've never done so before or don't owe any taxes.

That means families who didn't receive any of the advance tax credit payments during 2021 can claim the full amount of the credit on their tax returns. Those who received the payment in July-December must file a tax return to get the credit for the first six months of 2021, again, regardless of the family's tax filing history.

Divorced parents who share custody of their children often switch who claims the child tax credit each year when they file their returns. Because the tax credit payments were based on 2020 tax returns, they may or may not have gone to the parent with physical custody in 2021.

A parent who did not have physical custody in 2021, but who received the tax credit payments, could have to pay back at least part of that money. Here's another scenario that could complicate tax returns. Many families saw their income plummet during the pandemic but rebound as their jobs returned, and they may have received more than they should have in child tax credits. They may have to pay some of that money back.

Families who received payments should have received a notice — "Letter 6419, 2021 advance CTC" — letting them know for tax filing purposes how much they've been paid. Some of those forms may include incorrect information.

4. Did You Give To Charity?

The IRS again is allowing taxpayers who don’t itemize to claim a deduction of up to 0 (or 0 for married couples filing jointly) for filers who made charitable contributions in 2021.

Most charities apply, according to the IRS.

Taxpayers who itemize can claim a deduction for charitable contributions up to 100 percent of their adjusted gross income.

5. Answer The Virtual Currency Question

Even taxpayers who haven’t been involved in virtual currency need to pay attention to a question about it included on 2021 Forms 1040 and 1040-SSR.

The question asks if, at any time during 2021, the filer received, sold, exchanged or otherwise disposed of any financial interest in any virtual currency. Taxpayers should not leave this field blank but should check either "Yes" or "No."

6. Don’t Forget To Report Jobless Pay

The IRS says it’s seeing situations where people aren’t reporting unemployment compensation received in 2021. For the 2020 taxable year, a special law allowed taxpayers to exclude unemployment compensation, but it was only for that year. Unemployment compensation received in 2021 is generally taxable, so taxpayers should include it as income on their tax returns.

7. How To Get Extension, Find Other Answers

Taxpayers can request a six-month filing extension to Oct.17 to prevent late filing penalties by using IRS free filing services or Form 4868. But keep in mind that, while an extension grants additional time to file, tax payments are still due April 18 for most taxpayers.

Advice on filing can be found on sites such as GetYourRefund.org, operated by IRS-certified Volunteer Income Tax Assistance to help families earning less than about ,000 a year file their taxes for free. Volunteers provide help in both English and Spanish.

Other helpful sites are MyFreeTaxes.com, a United Way-supported site that provides virtual assistance to people who make ,000 or less to file their federal and state taxes for free, and many other free file sites curated with an IRS tool.

This article originally appeared on the Across Illinois Patch

support.taxslayer.com

The filing deadline for 2021 tax returns is April 18, 2022 The payment deadline is also April 18, 2022. Penalties and interest on underpayments will be calculated from that date If you receive a federal extension of more than six months, you are automatically allowed that …

Illinois 2021 tax deadline extended to match IRS federal ...

19-03-2021 · The Illinois Department of Revenue said 2.4 million people have already filed their state taxes, and more than 79% of taxpayers who have already filed are expecting a refund.

19-03-2021
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (WLS) -- Illinois has pushed back its state tax filing deadline to May 17, matching the change by the IRS.Governor JB Pritzker announced Thursday the state has extended the individual income tax filing deadline from April 15 to May 17. There is no change to how the state processes taxes filed before the deadline.The extension does not apply to estimated tax payments due on April 15, which are based on either 100% of estimated or 90% of actual liability for 2021, or 100% of actual liabilities for 2019 or 2020.The IRS announced an extension of the federal tax filing deadline to May 17 on Wednesday, saying it would allow more breathing room for taxpayers and the IRS alike to cope with changes brought on by the pandemic. Those who need more time beyond May 17 to complete their federal taxes can request an extension until October 15.

RELATED: IRS will delay tax filing due date until May 17

The decision to extend the deadline comes after an intense year for the chronically underfunded IRS. The pandemic hit in the middle of last year's tax filing season, setting the agency back in terms of processing. The IRS has also been a key player in doling out government relief payments, and is currently helping to send out the third round of payments in the middle of the current tax filing season.Additionally, the extension gives the IRS time to issue guidance on recent tax law changes. The American Rescue Plan excludes the first ,200 of unemployment benefits from federal taxes for those making less than 0,000."Never before has the law changed so substantially in the middle of tax filing season," Patrick Thomas, director of Notre Dame Law School's Tax Clinic, said in a statement.The Illinois Department of Revenue said 2.4 million people have already filed their state taxes, and more than 79% of taxpayers who have already filed are expecting a refund.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Report a correction or typo
nbcchicago.com

Illinois Extends Income Tax Filing Deadline, Pritzker Announces The extension does not apply to estimated tax payments due on April 15, 2021, according to Pritzker's office. Published March 18 ...

efile.com

Late Filing Penalty: You will be assessed a penalty of 0 or 2% of the tax owed (whatever is less) per month you file your return after the tax return deadline. The penalty is reduced by timely payments or credits. In the event you file your return on time but the return cannot be processed, you will have 30 days to correct the return before any penalty is due. If you do not file your return within 30 days after you …

What’s the Last Day You Can File Taxes for 2022? Here’s ...

15-04-2022 · 14 hours ago · Use Free File or Form 4868. But keep in mind that, while an extension grants additional time to file, tax payments are still due April 18 for most taxpayers. This article …

15-04-2022

As the 2022 Tax Day approaches, many people have two things on their minds: Deadlines and refunds.

This year, the filing date is later than usual.

Here's what you need to know about the 2022 tax deadline, and tax refunds this year.

While most Americans will have filed their taxes prior to Tax Day — which generally falls on April 15 — that isn’t the deadline for filing this year.

Instead, the vast majority of Americans will have to file their taxes by Monday, April 18.

The date change is due to Emancipation Day, a holiday observed in Washington D.C. marking the freeing of slaves, that is celebrated on April 16.

Federal employees are given the day off, including at the Internal Revenue Service.

This year, April 16 falls on a Saturday, meaning that the nearest weekday is on the 15th of the month.

As a result, the deadline for tax filing is pushed forward to April 18.

According to the IRS, one out of 10 refunds is issued in less than 21 days.

As of the week ending April 1, the IRS has sent out more than 63 million refunds worth over 4 billion.

2022 Tax Day: When Will You Get Your Refund? Here's What to Know

The average refund is ,226, according to the IRS.

The Illinois Department of Revenue said "in addition to free filing of Form IL-1040 through MyTax Illinois, individuals may also utilize the site to make payments, respond to department inquiries, and check the status of their refunds using the Where's My Refund? link."

Taxpaers can also calling the automated refund hotline at 1-800-829-1954.

"Where's My Refund?" can be used to check the status of a tax return within 24 hours after an e-file acceptance notification is received.

The “Where’s My Refund?” tool is updated only once every 24 hours. If it's been more than 21 days since a tax return was e-filed or more than six weeks since mailing a return, taxpayers can call a tax help hotline to talk to a representative.

The IRS says it "continues to make progress in this area and has taken numerous steps to help address this issue."

If you are still awaiting a 2020 tax return, you do not need to wait for it to be fully processed in order to file your 2021 taxes.

According to the IRS, those with unprocessed 2020 tax returns, should enter

(zero dollars) for last year's AGI on their 2021 tax return when electronically filing.

Are you eligible for an earned income tax credit? If you weren't last year, that may have changed.

Under new guidelines, more people without children qualify to receive the federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), the federal government's largest refundable tax credit for low- to moderate-income families, according to the Internal Revenue Service.

The tax claim could help taxpayers get an even bigger return, but according to the Illinois Department of Revenue, many Illinois residents are missing out.

The EITC and its Illinois counterpart, the Illinois Earned Income Credit (EIC), could bring bigger returns for eligible filers. But you'll need to claim it on your tax return in order to see the benefits.

In a change from past years, the federal credit is now available to more younger workers and senior citizens without children. To qualify, workers must be at least 19 years old and older than 64, according to the IRS. Previously, the credit for those with no dependents was only available for people age 25 to 64.

To find out if your family qualifies for the credit, click here.

Millions of Americans who have never filed a tax return will need to do so this year in order to claim what's coming to them under the enhanced child tax credit.

Previously, only people who earned enough money to owe income taxes could qualify for the full credit.

But as part of the

.9 trillion coronavirus relief package, President Joe Biden expanded the program, increasing the payments to up to ,600 annually for each child aged 5 or under and ,000 for those who are ages 6 to 17.

The monthly payments have amounted to 0 for each child 5 and younger and 0 for those between 5 and 17.

The government began to send the payments out — an overall billion — on a monthly basis starting last July. Now, there are an additional six months' worth of payments waiting to be claimed. And some families haven't collected any of the benefits they're due yet. In all, an estimated 3 billion is yet to be claimed.

The only way to receive that money is to file a tax return.

Here are some questions and answers about who's eligible for the credit and how to get it.

The IDR said it plans to extend its phone hours on April 15 from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. and on April 18 from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. to help answer residents' questions.

For the most up-to-date information, forms, schedules, and instructions for the 2022 tax season, residents can check tax.illinois.gov.

Here are some recommendations from the IRS:

File electronically. Taxpayers can use their computer, smartphone or tablet to file their taxes electronically, whether through IRS Free File or other e-file service providers, to help reduce mistakes. Tax software guides people through each section of their tax return using a question-and-answer format. Enter information carefully. This includes any information needed to calculate credits and deductions. Using tax software should help prevent math errors, but taxpayers should always review their tax return for accuracy.

Use the correct filing status. Tax software, including IRS Free File, also helps prevent mistakes when selecting a tax return filing status. If taxpayers are unsure about their filing status, the Interactive Tax Assistant on IRS.gov can help them choose the correct status, especially if more than one filing status applies.

Answer the virtual currency question. The 2021 Form 1040 and 1040-SR asks whether at any time during 2021, a person received, sold, exchanged or otherwise disposed of any financial interest in any virtual currency. Taxpayers should not leave this field blank but should check either “Yes” or “No.”

Report all taxable income. Underreporting income may lead to penalties and interest. Organized tax records help avoid errors that lead to processing delays and may also help to find overlooked deductions or credits. Taxpayers should have all their income documents on hand before starting their tax return. Examples are Forms W-2, 1099-MISC or 1099-NEC.

Include unemployment compensation. The IRS is seeing situations where people are not including unemployment compensation they received in 2021 on their tax returns. Although a special law allowed taxpayers to exclude unemployment compensation from taxes in 2020, it was only for that year. Unemployment compensation received in 2021 is generally taxable, so taxpayers should include it as income on their tax return.

Double-check name, birth date and Social Security number entries. Taxpayers must correctly list the name, Social Security number (SSN) and date of birth for each person they claim as a dependent on their individual income tax return. Enter each SSN and individual’s name on a tax return exactly as printed on the Social Security card. If a dependent or spouse does not have and is not eligible to get a SSN, list the Individual Tax Identification Number (ITIN) instead of a SSN.

Double check routing and account numbers. Requesting direct deposit of a federal refund into one, two or even three accounts is convenient and allows the taxpayer access to their money faster. Make sure the financial institution routing and account numbers entered on the return are accurate. Incorrect numbers can cause a refund to be delayed or deposited into the wrong account. Taxpayers can also use their refund to purchase U.S. Savings Bonds.

Mail paper returns to the right address. Paper filers should confirm the correct address for where to file on IRS.gov or on form instructions to avoid processing delays. Note that processing paper tax returns could take much longer than usual. Taxpayers and tax professionals are encouraged to file electronically if possible.

Sign and date the return. If filing a joint return, both spouses must sign and date the return. E-filers can sign using a self-selected personal identification number (PIN). Taxpayers should review the special instructions to validate their 2021 electronic tax return if their 2020 return has not yet been processed.

Keep a copy. When ready to file, taxpayers should make a copy of their signed return and all schedules for their records.

Request an extension, if needed. Taxpayers who cannot meet the April 18 deadline can easily request a six-month filing extension to Oct. 17 and prevent late filing penalties. Use Free File or Form 4868. But keep in mind that, while an extension grants additional time to file, tax payments are still due April 18 for most taxpayers.

IRS Extends Tax-Filing Deadline for Illinois and Tennessee ...

Tornado victims in Illinois and Tennessee counties designated as disaster areas by FEMA will receive an extended (May 16, 2022) deadline to file and pay 2021 taxes in 2022.

As promised by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), victims of recent tornados in parts of Illinois and Tennesse, like their neighbors in Kentucky, will have until May 16, 2022, to file individual and business tax returns and make tax-related payments. The IRS has offered this relief to taxpayers affected by storms, tornadoes, and flooding that took place beginning December 10 in parts of Illinois and Tennessee. Specifically, taxpayers and business owners in the Illinois counties of Bond, Cass, Coles, Effingham, Fayette, Jersey, Macoupin, Madison, Montgomery, Morgan, Moultrie, Pike, and Shelby and residents of Cheatham, Decatur, Dickson, Dyer, Gibson, Lake, Obion, Stewart, and Weakley counties in Tennessee are eligible for these extensions.

According to the IRS, the same relief will also be provided to any other areas designated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA ) in these and neighboring states. In addition, the IRS will work with "any taxpayer who lives outside the disaster area but whose records necessary to meet a deadline occurring during the postponement period are located in the affected area." These taxpayers—who include relief workers affiliated with recognized organizations—need to call the IRS at 866-562-5227. A list of eligible areas is always available on the IRS Disaster Relief page.

  • Tornado victims in Illinois and Tennessee counties designated as disaster areas by FEMA will receive an extended (May 16, 2022) deadline to file and pay 2021 taxes in 2022.
  • Any other locality eventually so designated by FEMA will also receive the same extension according to the IRS.
  • This tax-filing extension is automatic and does not require an application.
  • A list of all eligible areas is available on the disaster relief page on IRS.gov.
  • The new May 16 filing deadline includes individual & business returns, certain other business forms, 2021 IRA contributions, and farmers who forgo estimated tax payments.

The relief provided by the IRS affects tax-filing and payment deadlines that occur starting on Dec. 10, 2021. Affected individuals and businesses have until May 16, 2022, to file returns and pay any taxes that were originally due during this period including:

  • 2021 individual income tax returns originally due on April 18
  • 2021 business returns due on March 15 and April 18
  • 2021 IRA contributions
  • Farmers who forgo estimated tax payments and normally file their returns by March 1

Quarterly estimated income tax payments normally due on Jan. 18 and April 18 are now delayed for taxpayers in affected areas. Now those taxpayers can include those payments with their 2021 taxes filed on May 16, 2022.

Quarterly payroll and excise tax returns normally due on Jan. 31 and May 2, 2022, can be delayed to May 16, 2022, by businesses or individuals located in and FEMA designated disaster area as a result of the Dec. 10th and 11th tornados. In addition, penalties on payroll and excise tax deposits due on or after December 10 and before December 27 will be abated as long as the deposits take place by December 27, 2021

The IRS disaster relief page contains details on other types of returns, payments, and tax-related actions that qualify for this filing extension.

In most cases, taxpayers don't need to take special action as long as their address is located in a FEMA disaster area. The IRS will automatically file and provide penalty relief. It is not necessary to file for a tax extension or contact the IRS to get this relief. Taxpayers who receive a late filing or late payment penalty notice from the IRS that they should not have received, should call the number on the notice to have the penalty abated.

Taxpayers who live in a declared disaster area do not need to file for an extension for this disaster-related tax relief. The IRS will use the taxpayer's legal address to determine eligibility and automatically grant the extension.

Anyone who lives outside the disaster area but whose tax-related records are located within the disaster area should contact the IRS at 866-562-5227 to receive assistance. In addition, workers assisting relief operations and affiliated with a recognized government or philanthropic organization should call the number above to work with the IRS to avoid penalties.

Individuals and businesses in a federally declared disaster area in Illinois or Tennessee who suffered uninsured or unreimbursed disaster-related losses can claim those losses on their 2021 tax return filed on May 16, 2022, or as an amended 2020 tax return.

In all cases, taxpayers are advised to be sure to write the FEMA declaration number – 3577EM for Illinois or 3576EM for Tennessee − on any return claiming a loss. IRS Publication 547 contains details.

Illinois Pushing Back Income Tax Filing Deadline To May 17 ...

March 19, 2021 / 12:00 PM / CBS Chicago. CHICAGO (CBS) -- Illinois is giving taxpayers extra time to file their income taxes this year, pushing back the filing deadline from April 15 to May 17 ...

chicago

/ CBS Chicago

CHICAGO (CBS) -- Illinois is giving taxpayers extra time to file their income taxes this year, pushing back the filing deadline from April 15 to May 17, mirroring a change by the IRS for filing federal returns.

Gov. JB Pritzker's office announced the change on Thursday, after the Internal Revenue Service announced it was moving the deadline for filing federal income taxes until May 17.

The change in the state's income tax filing deadline won't apply to estimated tax payments that are due on April 15, which are based on either 100% of estimated or 90% of actual liability for 2021, or 100% of actual liabilities for 2019 or 2020.

State officials said the fastest way to receive any tax refund you might be owed is to file your return electronically, and sign up for direct deposit into your bank account.

"The filing extension for individual income tax takes effect automatically, so no further action is required by taxpayers to take advantage. For taxpayers awaiting a refund, utilize IDOR's Where's My Refund? to locate specific information about the status of any refund due," Illinois Department of Revenue Director David Harris said in a statement.

You can file Illinois income tax returns for free at the state's MyTax Illinois website.

Accountants had asked the IRS to push back the federal deadline given the ongoing challenges of the coronavirus pandemic for taxpayers and the IRS, which is still dealing with a backlog of tax returns from last year.

The American Institute of CPAs this week had urged the IRS to delay the filing deadline, citing the impact of the pandemic on U.S. taxpayers as well as the tax agency itself, which is still trying to dig out of a backlog of returns from the last tax filing season. Lawmakers on Wednesday applauded the tax agency for the extension, calling it "absolutely necessary."

"The practitioners have been saying, 'We're here, but there aren't enough hours in the day to get everything done that has been put in front of us,'" said Meredith Tucker, tax principal at accounting firm Kaufman Rossin. "It's tough to think we will be under tax season for another month, but we need more time."

Tax preparers have been assessing changes to the tax code, including last week's

.9 trillion American Rescue Plan, which will impact issues ranging from taxes on unemployment aid to the Child Tax Credit, as well as loans from the Paycheck Protection Program.

The extra time applies to individual taxpayers, including those who pay self-employment taxes, such as sole proprietors and gig-economy workers, the IRS said. It added that individual taxpayers don't need to file any forms or call the IRS to qualify for the May 17 deadline.

Given previous tax seasons, it's likely that half of taxpayers have yet to file their returns, said Curtis Campbell, president of TaxAct. He added that even with the extra breathing room, taxpayers should still plan on getting their returns to the IRS sooner rather than later.

"I would advise folks to still file as soon as they can, especially if they are in need of their tax refund," Campbell said. "The IRS is doing all they can to help deliver quickly for consumers and getting them their latest updated information may help tax filers get their return and potential other future economic payments faster."

First published on March 19, 2021 / 12:00 PM

© 2021 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved.

www2.illinois.gov

April 15, 2021, to May 17, 2021. Individual taxpayers can postpone Illinois income tax payments for the 2020 tax year due on April 15, 2021, to May 17, 2021. This deadline extension coincides with the dates for filing federal income tax returns. Note: This does NOT impact the estimated tax payments that are due on April 15, 2021.

2022 Tax Day: What to Know About This Year’s Tax Deadline ...

12-04-2022 · 2 days ago · NBCUniversal Media, LLC. April 15 is a day that many Americans dread, as it represents the traditional deadline day for individuals to file their state and federal income tax returns. 2022 Tax Day ...

12-04-2022

2022 Tax Day is closing in — and for many, it's a day focused on two things: Deadlines, and refunds.

This year, the filing date is later than usual.

Here's what you need to know about the 2022 tax deadline, and tax refunds this year.

While most Americans will have filed their taxes prior to Tax Day — which generally falls on April 15 — that isn’t the deadline for filing this year.

Instead, the vast majority of Americans will have to file their taxes by Monday, April 18.

The date change is due Emancipation Day, a holiday observed in Washington D.C. marking the freeing of slaves, that is celebrated on April 16.

Federal employees are given the day off, including at the Internal Revenue Service.

This year, April 16 falls on a Saturday, meaning that the nearest weekday is on the 15th of the month.

As a result, the deadline for tax filing is pushed forward to April 18.

According to the IRS, one out of 10 refunds is issued in less than 21 days.

As of the week ending April 1, the IRS has sent out more than 63 million refunds worth over 4 billion.

2022 Tax Day: When Will You Get Your Refund? Here's What to Know

The average refund is ,226, according to the IRS.

The Illinois Department of Revenue said "in addition to free filing of Form IL-1040 through MyTax Illinois, individuals may also utilize the site to make payments, respond to department inquiries, and check the status of their refunds using the Where's My Refund? link."

Taxpaers can also calling the automated refund hotline at 1-800-829-1954.

"Where's My Refund?" can be used to check the status of a tax return within 24 hours after an e-file acceptance notification is received.

The “Where’s My Refund?” tool is updated only once every 24 hours. If it's been more than 21 days since a tax return was e-filed or more than six weeks since mailing a return, taxpayers can call a tax help hotline to talk to a representative.

The IRS says it "continues to make progress in this area and has taken numerous steps to help address this issue."

If you are still awaiting a 2020 tax return, you do not need to wait for it to be fully processed in order to file your 2021 taxes.

According to the IRS, those with unprocessed 2020 tax returns, should enter

(zero dollars) for last year's AGI on their 2021 tax return when electronically filing.

Are you eligible for an earned income tax credit? If you weren't last year, that may have changed.

Under new guidelines, more people without children qualify to receive the federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), the federal government's largest refundable tax credit for low- to moderate-income families, according to the Internal Revenue Service.

The tax claim could help taxpayers get an even bigger return, but according to the Illinois Department of Revenue, many Illinois residents are missing out.

The EITC and its Illinois counterpart, the Illinois Earned Income Credit (EIC), could bring bigger returns for eligible filers. But you'll need to claim it on your tax return in order to see the benefits.

In a change from past years, the federal credit is now available to more younger workers and senior citizens without children. To qualify, workers must be at least 19 years old and older than 64, according to the IRS. Previously, the credit for those with no dependents was only available for people age 25 to 64.

To find out if your family qualifies for the credit, click here.

Millions of Americans who have never filed a tax return will need to do so this year in order to claim what's coming to them under the enhanced child tax credit.

Previously, only people who earned enough money to owe income taxes could qualify for the full credit.

But as part of the

.9 trillion coronavirus relief package, President Joe Biden expanded the program, increasing the payments to up to ,600 annually for each child aged 5 or under and ,000 for those who are ages 6 to 17.

The monthly payments have amounted to 0 for each child 5 and younger and 0 for those between 5 and 17.

The government began to send the payments out — an overall billion — on a monthly basis starting last July. Now, there are an additional six months' worth of payments waiting to be claimed. And some families haven't collected any of the benefits they're due yet. In all, an estimated 3 billion is yet to be claimed.

The only way to receive that money is to file a tax return.

Here are some questions and answers about who's eligible for the credit and how to get it.

The IDR said it plans to extend its phone hours on April 15 from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. and on April 18 from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. to help answer residents' questions.

For the most up-to-date information, forms, schedules, and instructions for the 2022 tax season, residents can check tax.illinois.gov.

Here are some recommendations from the IRS:

File electronically. Taxpayers can use their computer, smartphone or tablet to file their taxes electronically, whether through IRS Free File or other e-file service providers, to help reduce mistakes. Tax software guides people through each section of their tax return using a question-and-answer format. Enter information carefully. This includes any information needed to calculate credits and deductions. Using tax software should help prevent math errors, but taxpayers should always review their tax return for accuracy.

Use the correct filing status. Tax software, including IRS Free File, also helps prevent mistakes when selecting a tax return filing status. If taxpayers are unsure about their filing status, the Interactive Tax Assistant on IRS.gov can help them choose the correct status, especially if more than one filing status applies.

Answer the virtual currency question. The 2021 Form 1040 and 1040-SR asks whether at any time during 2021, a person received, sold, exchanged or otherwise disposed of any financial interest in any virtual currency. Taxpayers should not leave this field blank but should check either “Yes” or “No.”

Report all taxable income. Underreporting income may lead to penalties and interest. Organized tax records help avoid errors that lead to processing delays and may also help to find overlooked deductions or credits. Taxpayers should have all their income documents on hand before starting their tax return. Examples are Forms W-2, 1099-MISC or 1099-NEC.

Include unemployment compensation. The IRS is seeing situations where people are not including unemployment compensation they received in 2021 on their tax returns. Although a special law allowed taxpayers to exclude unemployment compensation from taxes in 2020, it was only for that year. Unemployment compensation received in 2021 is generally taxable, so taxpayers should include it as income on their tax return.

Double-check name, birth date and Social Security number entries. Taxpayers must correctly list the name, Social Security number (SSN) and date of birth for each person they claim as a dependent on their individual income tax return. Enter each SSN and individual’s name on a tax return exactly as printed on the Social Security card. If a dependent or spouse does not have and is not eligible to get a SSN, list the Individual Tax Identification Number (ITIN) instead of a SSN.

Double check routing and account numbers. Requesting direct deposit of a federal refund into one, two or even three accounts is convenient and allows the taxpayer access to their money faster. Make sure the financial institution routing and account numbers entered on the return are accurate. Incorrect numbers can cause a refund to be delayed or deposited into the wrong account. Taxpayers can also use their refund to purchase U.S. Savings Bonds.

Mail paper returns to the right address. Paper filers should confirm the correct address for where to file on IRS.gov or on form instructions to avoid processing delays. Note that processing paper tax returns could take much longer than usual. Taxpayers and tax professionals are encouraged to file electronically if possible.

Sign and date the return. If filing a joint return, both spouses must sign and date the return. E-filers can sign using a self-selected personal identification number (PIN). Taxpayers should review the special instructions to validate their 2021 electronic tax return if their 2020 return has not yet been processed.

Keep a copy. When ready to file, taxpayers should make a copy of their signed return and all schedules for their records.

Request an extension, if needed. Taxpayers who cannot meet the April 18 deadline can easily request a six-month filing extension to Oct. 17 and prevent late filing penalties. Use Free File or Form 4868. But keep in mind that, while an extension grants additional time to file, tax payments are still due April 18 for most taxpayers.

efile.com

If you do owe taxes, in many cases, you can pay your state taxes online. This payment will serve as extension. Ongoing. IRS Tax Amendment State Tax Amendment(s) You can prepare your amendment on eFile.com for Tax Year 2021, then print, sign, and mail in the forms. There are plans to e-File amendment Form 1040X by mid 2022. State tax amendments follow a similar procedure, but do not use the IRS ...

ibjonline.com

The IRS disaster relief page has details on other returns, payments and tax-related actions qualifying for the additional time. The IRS automatically provides filing and penalty relief to any taxpayer with an IRS address of record located in the disaster area. Therefore, taxpayers do not need to contact the agency to get this relief.

msn.com

The change in the state’s income tax filing deadline won’t apply to estimated tax payments that are due on April 15, which are based on either 100% of estimated or 90% of actual liability for 2021,...

July 15 Tax Deadline: 5 Things To Know In Illinois ...

01-07-2020 · July 15 Tax Deadline: 5 Things To Know In Illinois - Across Illinois, IL - After being extended three months because of the coronavirus crisis, the 2019 tax deadline is …

01-07-2020

ILLINOIS — The Treasury Department and the IRS announced Monday that they would not extend the July 15 deadline for Americans, including residents in Illinois to file 2019 income tax returns and pay taxes owed for that year.

The Treasury and IRS previously extended tax filing and payment deadlines from April 15 to July 15 due to the coronavirus pandemic. That applies to both state and federal taxes in Illinois.

The commitment to July 15 comes less than a week after Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said that pushing the deadline back even further was "something we may consider."

"After consulting with various external stakeholders, we have decided to have taxpayers request an extension if more time is needed," Mnuchin said in a news release late Monday. "I would encourage Americans to file their taxes as soon as possible, so those who are due refunds can receive them quickly."

Here are five things to know about filing and paying your taxes by July 15 in Illinois:

  1. You can still receive an extension to file your taxes.

As Mnuchin mentioned on Monday, extensions past the July 15 date are still available for some aspects of your taxes. If you are unable to submit your paperwork by the given deadline, you can get an extension until Oct. 15.

However, this is only an extension to file, not an extension to pay.

The form to apply for an extension to file is available on the IRS website.

  1. Failure to pay or properly file for an extension will result in penalties.

The possibility of penalties means that taking the extension to file your taxes is most likely the smart move, if you don't have your paperwork ready to go by July 15.

The penalty for not filing is 5 percent of the unpaid tax you owe, tallied for each month you're late for up to five months. Additionally, the underpayment penalty is 0.5 percent per month.

The standard deduction is a dollar amount that reduces the amount of income on which you are taxed and varies according to your filing status.

  • Single: ,200 — up from ,000 for 2018.
  • Married filing jointly or qualifying widow: ,400 — up from ,000 for 2018.
  • Married filing separately: ,200 — up from ,000 for 2018.
  • Head of household: ,350 — up from ,000 for 2018.

IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig said in a news release that "the IRS understands that those affected by the coronavirus may not be able to pay their balances in full by July 15, but we have many payment options to help taxpayers."

As part of the IRS' "The People First Initiative," the federal agency is offering a variety of relief options to taxpayers experiencing hardships related to the COVID-19 crisis.

The options include postponing certain payments related to Installment Agreements and Offers in Compromise, to collection and limiting certain enforcement actions.

You can find more information about the "People First Initiative" on the IRS website.

  1. Statistics show that fewer people are filing their taxes in 2020.

The coronavirus pandemic is affecting the number of people filing their tax returns.

According to IRS data, the number of processed tax returns on a year-over-year basis was down 11.4 percent as of June 19. Additionally, the number of refunds was down 10.8 percent.

People preparing for taxes were "stymied because of working from home and not being able to access all of the resources they had while in their offices," Craig Richard, the director of tax services at Fiduciary Trust International, said in an interview with USA Today.

chicagotribune.com

18-03-2021 · Illinois residents will now have until May 17 to file their individual state income taxes and to make any payments, Gov. J.B. Pritzker announced Thursday.

18-03-2021
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Illinois residents will now have until May 17 to file their individual state income taxes and to make any payments, Gov. J.B. Pritzker announced Thursday.

The announcement comes one day after the Internal Revenue Service’s decision to extend the federal filing due date to the same day, saying it “wants to continue to do everything possible to help taxpayers navigate the unusual circumstances related to the pandemic.”

The state income tax extension does not apply to estimated tax payments that are due April 15, the traditional tax filing deadline.

Illinois Department of Revenue Director David Harris said the fastest way to receive a refund is to file electronically and request a direct deposit.

Gov. J.B. Pritzker speaks at the Thompson Center in Chicago on March 18, 2021.
Gov. J.B. Pritzker speaks at the Thompson Center in Chicago on March 18, 2021. (Jose M. Osorio / Chicago Tribune)

“The filing extension for individual income tax takes effect automatically, so no further action is required by taxpayers to take advantage,” Harris said in a statement. “For taxpayers awaiting a refund, utilize IDOR’s Where’s My Refund? to locate specific information about the status of any refund due.”

[Most read] Salir a vender o morir de hambre en casa, dilema para peruana »

The Illinois Department of Revenue continues to process refunds for those filing prior to the deadline. The department reported 2.4 million people have already filed their returns, 79% of whom are expecting a refund.

Officials from the governor’s office said free filing of Form IL-1040 is available through the MyTax Illinois website, where tax filers can also make payments, respond to department inquiries and look up IL-PINs.

money.com

The state tax filing and payment deadline has been moved to May 17, 2021. Pennsylvania. The state tax filing and payment deadline has been moved to May 17, 2021. Rhode Island. The state tax filing and payment deadline has been moved to May 17, 2021. South Carolina. The state tax filing and payment deadline has been moved to May 17, 2021. …

taxuni.com

Ali Gray Last Updated: March 19, 2021 The state of Illinois residents is subject to state income taxes. The tax deadline has been extended for the 2021 tax season due to COVID-19. Since thousands of Illinois residents earned their income during 2020 from different sources such as freelancing jobs, unemployment compensation, or similar.

Individual Federal and Illinois Income Tax Deadline for ...

The Internal Revenue Service and the State of Illinois have officially moved the 2020 income tax filing deadline for individuals to May 17, 2021 from April 15, 2021. Individual taxpayers can also postpone Federal and Illinois income tax payments due for the 2020 tax year to May 17, 2021 without incurring additional penalties or interest.

The Internal Revenue Service and the State of Illinois have officially moved the 2020 income tax filing deadline for individuals to May 17, 2021 from April 15, 2021. Individual taxpayers can also postpone Federal and Illinois income tax payments due for the 2020 tax year to May 17, 2021 without incurring additional penalties or interest.  

While this is welcome news for some taxpayers, there are a number of concerns that this limited extension does not address. The IRS extension does not:

  • Extend the time for paying first quarter estimated income taxes for the 2021 tax year. These payments remain due on April 15, 2021. It is difficult for taxpayers to determine the amount of the estimated tax required without, at least, a reasonable estimate of their 2020 tax situation. Without an extension of these payments, the filing extension to May 17, 2021 has minimal value for many taxpayers.
  • Extend other tax filings and payments that are currently due on April 15, 2021, including: • Federal and Illinois income tax filings and tax payments for the calendar year 2020 trust returns; and

    • Federal and Illinois income tax filings and tax payments for the calendar year 2020 corporate returns.

The state and local tax authorities are not obligated to match the Federal extension either. While several states like Illinois have independently extended their due dates, the vast majority have not and we await separate guidance on a jurisdiction-by-jurisdiction basis.

We will keep you informed as additional guidance becomes available.

If you have questions or concerns regarding this Client Alert, please contact Frank Washelesky at [email protected] or your ORBA advisor.

Forward Thinking

2020 IRS and Illinois Income Tax Filing Season Extended to ...

22-03-2021 · In the event a taxpayer does not make sufficient quarterly estimated tax payments, the IRS may assess estimated tax penalties. 2020 Illinois Income Tax Extension. On March 18, 2021, Governor Pritzker announced that the 2020 Illinois tax filing and payment deadline would be extended from April 15 to May 17, 2021, giving all Illinois taxpayers an ...

22-03-2021

2020 Federal Income Tax Extension

On March 17, 2021, the IRS announced that the due date for individuals to file their 2020 federal income tax returns (e.g., Form 1040, 1040-EZ) will be automatically extended from April 15, 2021 to May 17, 2021. Individual taxpayers do not need to do anything to qualify for the extension. The extension includes both filing and non-estimated payment obligations, which means that interest and delinquency penalties will not accrue for payments made on or before May 17, 2021.

Any taxpayers needing additional time to prepare and file their 2020 tax returns can submit a Form 4868 extension of time to file, which will extend the filing deadline to October 15, 2021. However, the Form 4868 will not extend the payment deadline, so all income taxes must be paid by May 17th to avoid interest and penalties.

While the extension includes individuals who report self-employment income through Schedule C or flow-through income on Schedule E, it does not presently include partnerships, limited liability companies, or S corporations filing Forms 1065 or 1120S which were due March 15, 2021. The extension also does not presently cover C corporations filing Form 1120 which are due by April 15, 2021.

Finally, the extension does not apply to first quarter 2021 estimated tax payments which are due April 15, 2021. In general, estimated tax payments must be paid for independent contractors, self-employed individuals, and other individuals who do not have taxes withheld from their income. The amount of estimated taxes is generally based on the lesser of: (i) 90% of the tax estimated for 2021, or (ii) 100% of the tax shown on the 2020 tax return. Estimated tax payments are made by filing Form 1040-ES with payment each quarter. In the event a taxpayer does not make sufficient quarterly estimated tax payments, the IRS may assess estimated tax penalties.

2020 Illinois Income Tax Extension

On March 18, 2021, Governor Pritzker announced that the 2020 Illinois tax filing and payment deadline would be extended from April 15 to May 17, 2021, giving all Illinois taxpayers an extra month to file and pay their 2020 income tax liabilities. Taxpayers expecting liabilities may benefit by this extension by deferring payment. Taxpayers expecting refunds can still file at any time to receive their refund ahead of the deadline.

However, first quarter 2021 estimated tax payments are still due on April 15, 2021. The amount is the estimated payment should either be: (i) 100% of the estimated liability for 2021, (ii) 90% of the actual liability for 2021, or (iii) 100% of actual liabilities for 2019 or 2020.

Similar to the federal extension, the Illinois extension only applies to individuals, and does not cover businesses.

Sandra Mertens
[email protected]

Illinois’ Income Tax Deadline Arrives Monday

15-05-2021 · Illinois' Income Tax Deadline Arrives Monday You might be missing out on a major Illinois tax credit that could provide major returns Published May 16, 2021 • Updated on May …

15-05-2021

The deadline for Illinois' Earned Income Tax Credit is less than a day away and could bring taxpayers an even bigger return this year.

The federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and its Illinois counterpart, the Illinois Earned Income Credit (EIC) could bring bigger returns for eligible filers in the state. But you'll need to claim it on your tax return in order to get it.

The filing deadline for 2020 income taxes is Monday.

The Illinois Department of Revenue issued a reminder to residents that the credits "are powerful tools that reward low- and moderate-income taxpayers for their hard work, yet thousands of eligible taxpayers fail to claim this refundable credit on their taxes."

“I encourage taxpayers to check their eligibility for the state EIC and federal EITC,” David Harris, director for the Illinois Department of Revenue, said in a statement. “The earned income credit puts thousands of dollars in the pockets of hard-working families every year. Even if an individual does not owe any tax, they may be eligible. That’s money that can be used for groceries, rent, utilities and other bills.”

The refundable credit is worth up to 18% of federal claims, for those who are eligible.

Still, in 2020, more than 13,000 Illinoisans claimed the federal credit, but failed to claim the state's version. According to the IDOR, million was left unclaimed last year alone.

To be eligible, taxpayers have to meet income and residency qualifications and file a tax return, even if they don't owe taxes or are not required to file. Illinois residents must be eligible for federal earned income tax credit in order to receive the state credit.

According to the IDOR, the earned income tax credit can mean up to a ,660 refund when a taxpayer files a return with qualifying children. Workers without a qualifying child could be eligible for a smaller credit up to 8. According to the Internal Revenue Service, the average amount credited for 2020 was ,461.

To find out if your family qualifies for the credit, click here.

Gov. Pritzker moves Illinois income tax filing deadline as ...

25-03-2020 · The Treasury Department and Internal Revenue Service announced on Saturday that the federal income tax filing due date will be automatically extended from April 15, 2020, to …

25-03-2020

Gov. J.B. Pritzker on Wednesday said he’s heeding the many calls from Illinois residents worried about paying their taxes amid job losses and instability caused by the coronavirus outbreak and will delay next month’s state income tax filing deadline.

Illinois Republicans were also pressuring the Democratic governor for a delay after the federal government pushed back its deadline over the weekend.

“I am proud to announce an important new measure to support our residents and most small businesses, and to soften the immediate economic impact of this moment,” Pritzker said at his Wednesday briefing. “Illinois will delay our tax deadline from April 15 to July 15, aligning our tax day with the federal government’s and giving our millions of taxpayers three additional months to file their individual returns.”

Pritzker’s delay also includes tax payments. About 3.4 million Illinoisans have already filed their tax returns, and the state is still processing refunds for those who file ahead of the new deadline.

The U.S. Treasury Department and Internal Revenue Service announced on Saturday that the federal income tax filing due date will be automatically extended from April 15 to July 15.

Illinois officials also on Wednesday announced the deaths of three more people from the coronavirus. So far, 19 people have died from the outbreak in Illinois.

An additional 330 cases have been added to the state’s total, bringing the Illinois tally to 1,865 cases in 35 counties. Ages of those afflicted range from an infant to 99 years. Those cases include two correctional officers and one man incarcerated at Stateville Correctional Center, as well as a contractual worker at Sheridan Correctional Center. The two correctional officers are in isolation at home, while the inmate is in a hospital, the department said.

Both Stateville and Sheridan have been placed on a 14-day lockdown, with anyone who may have been exposed at Stateville being quarantined, the department said.

The governor also announced three programs for small businesses to access a share of million in state emergency assistance, beginning on Friday. Additionally, Pritzker said he’s reached out to national mortgage companies to ask for a multi-month forbearance. The governor also has reached out to the three national credit bureaus, asking them not to lower residents’ credit ratings during this time.

A small business emergency loan fund will include million in low-interest loans of up to ,000 for small businesses in every industry outside of Chicago. Businesses with less than 50 employees and less than million in revenue last year are eligible, and would owe nothing for six months and then pay fixed payments at 3% interest, the governor’s office said.

Another million program will be used to support small businesses in suburban and rural counties across Illinois, providing grants of up to ,000 to small businesses. And a million grant program will help small hospitality businesses make ends meet, providing up to ,000 to eligible bars and restaurants and up to ,000 for eligible hotels.

Speaking at the daily briefing, Michael Jacobson, president of the Illinois Hotel and Lodging Association, said hotels over the past month were projected to have an occupancy rate of 70%. They’re now in the teens or single digits.

“The damage is worse than the impacts of 9/11 and the 2008 recession combined,” Jacobson said.

But Jacobson encouraged small hotel owners to explore eligibility for relief funds that Pritzker is offering for small businesses. Jacobson said, so far, 20,000 hotel rooms in Illinois are being used for housing healthcare workers, first responders and for hospital overflow.

The White House and U.S. Senate on Wednesday struck a major deal on a trillion package, making it the largest emergency aid package the nation has seen. It includes direct payment to Americans and help with unemployment and to small businesses.

Pritzker — who has been critical of the federal response to coronavirus — said he hopes to see passage of the package as soon as possible.

“My expectation is that people at the federal government level want to do the right thing,” Pritzker said. “We’re continuing to protect the people of the state of Illinois, and I’m going to do whatever it takes, frankly, to get that job done. And sometimes, when I have to be critical in order to get something done, I’m going to be doing that.”

Also on Wednesday. Democratic U.S. Senators Dick Durbin and Tammy Duckworth sent a letter to President Donald Trump to try to bolster Pritzker’s request for a federal disaster declaration in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

Illinois has requested assistance for all 102 counties in the state. The federal declaration would give Illinois access to more federal benefits.

Beyond the financial and health impact of the pandemic, Pritzker on Wednesday was asked about the emotional toll the outbreak is taking on his own administration.

A day prior, Dr. Ngozi Ezike, who has appeared next to Pritzker for 17 consecutive daily briefings, became emotional when announcing the latest fatalities — noting that many families can’t mourn their loved ones in a world of social distancing.

”It is hard. I’m a doctor. I’m a mother, and I just buried my father last month,” the Illinois Public Health Department chief responded with tears in her eyes. “And so when I think about people who can’t do what I did for my father last month, I feel it very real, as to what people are going through and the sacrifices they are making.”

Pritzker, himself, said, “We’re all holding up just fine.” He detailed that a close friend and members of the friend’s family all have fevers and symptoms of coronavirus.

”All of us, I think, are aware of how serious this situation is and are touched by somebody, somebody at work, somebody at home, somebody in your life, no doubt, that has contracted this or is affected by it,” Pritzker said. “So I appreciate the concern.”

Federal Tax Deadline Moved; Illinois Deadline Also ...

18-03-2021 · Posted Thu, Mar 18, 2021 at 12:57 pm CT | Updated Thu, Mar 18, 2021 at 6:37 pm CT Replies (16) The IRS has moved the deadline for filing federal income tax …

18-03-2021

ILLINOIS — Illinois residents will once again get some breathing room for filing their federal income tax returns.

The Internal Revenue Service said Wednesday the due date for the 2020 tax year for individuals was being moved by about a month: from April 15 to May 17. The agency said it would provide formal guidance in the coming days.

On Thursday, Gov. J.B. Pritzker announced that the state tax filing deadline has also been extended until May 17.

Here's what else the IRS said taxpayers need to know about the extended deadline:

  • Taxpayers can postpone federal income tax payments that would be due April 15 to May 17 without any penalties or interest regardless of the amount owed
  • The postponement is for individual taxpayers, including those who pay self-employment tax
  • Penalties or interest in unpaid balances will begin to accrue May 17
  • Taxes paid by May 17 will automatically avoid interests and penalties
  • Taxpayers will automatically qualify for this relief and don't need to file any forms

Anyone who needs an extension beyond May 17 can file to request an extension until October 15 but any taxes due would still need to be paid by May 17.

The agency also clarified that the extension doesn't extend to estimated tax payments; the money withheld in paychecks or the estimated tax payments people make if their income isn't withheld automatically.

Illinois income tax deadline: Filing extended to May 17 ...

Illinois is following the lead of the Internal Revenue Service and extending the filing deadline for individual income taxes to May 17.. The Illinois Department of Revenue reports of …

An online tax software will calculate your adjusted gross income (AGI) for you.

Illinois is following the lead of the Internal Revenue Service and extending the filing deadline for individual income taxes to May 17. 

The Illinois Department of Revenue reports of 2.4 million people in Illinois have already filed their income taxes for the past year. Seventy-nine percent of those who have already filed are expecting a refund from the state this year. 

April 15 is typically the required deadline for filing individual income taxes. 

"The filing extension for individual income tax takes effect automatically, so no further action is required by taxpayers to take advantage. For taxpayers awaiting a refund, utilize IDOR’s Where’s My Refund? to locate specific information about the status of any refund due,” IDOR director David Harris said in a statement. 

Harris also said the fastest and most secure way to receive a refund on a tax return is to file electronically and request a direct deposit to a bank account.

More:Pritzker paves way for COVID vaccines for all Illinoisans 16 and older starting in April

Estimated tax payments will still be due on April 15.

Last year, over 6.4 million individual income tax returns were filed and 87% filed them online. 

This is the second year in a row the IRS and state have moved the filing deadline back to accommodate complications related to the COVID-19 pandemic. In 2020, the income tax filing deadline was pushed back to July 15. 

wsiltv.com

RELATED: IRS to delay tax filing deadline to mid-May. The filing extension does not apply to estimated tax payments that are due on April 15, 2021. These payments are still due on April 15 and can ...

hfchronicle.com

Illinois taxpayers have until Wednesday, July 15, to pay their outstanding 2019 income taxes. The Illinois Department of Revenue (IDOR) is reminding taxpayers of the state individual income tax filing and payment deadline. The traditional April 15 deadline was extended three months by Gov. J.B. Pritzker in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Illinois taxpayers have until Wednesday, July 15, to pay their outstanding 2019 income taxes. 

The Illinois Department of Revenue (IDOR) is reminding taxpayers of the state individual income tax filing and payment deadline. The traditional April 15 deadline was extended three months by Gov. J.B. Pritzker in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Both state and federal returns are due on July 15.

“It is time to file your taxes if you have not already done so and we stand ready to assist,” said IDOR Director David Harris. “While the COVID-19 pandemic unfolded, the Department of Revenue worked hard to ensure taxpayer access to services and timely processing of refunds.”  

To date, 5.3 million Illinois taxpayers have filed their 2019 Illinois individual income tax returns, which is approximately 85 percent of expected returns. Of those, 3.3 million taxpayers have received refunds totaling

.4 billion. The fastest way to receive a refund is to file electronically and select the direct deposit option.

Individuals needing support may call IDOR's telephone assistance hotline at 1-800-732-8866. All Illinois taxpayers can file their Form IL-1040 free using the MyTax Illinois website. 

Taxpayers can also use the MyTax portal to check on the status of their refund, make a payment, retrieve their PIN, or look up their estimated/extension payments. Some lower-income taxpayers can also file their federal returns for free through the Internal Revenue Service’s FreeFile program; visit irs.gov for more information.

walls102.com

The Illinois Department of Revenue will continue to process tax refunds for those filing ahead of the deadline. The filing extension does not apply to …

millercooper.com

The filing and payment deadline for Illinois income tax returns has been extended from April 15, 2020 to July 15, 2020. This filing and payment relief includes: The 2019 income tax filing and payment deadlines for all taxpayers who file and pay their Illinois income taxes on April 15, 2020 are automatically extended until July 15, 2020.

www2.illinois.gov

The filing deadline for Illinois income tax returns has been extended from April 15, 2020, to July 15, 2020. This filing and payment relief includes: The 2019 income tax filing and payment deadlines for all taxpayers who file and pay their Illinois income taxes on April 15, 2020, are automatically extended until July 15, 2020. This relief applies to all individual returns, trusts,

salestaxhandbook.com

January 20. January 20 1. Simplify Illinois sales tax compliance! We provide sales tax rate databases for businesses who manage their own sales taxes, and can also connect you with firms that can completely automate the sales tax calculation and filing process. Click here to get more information.

Illinois to extend individual income tax filing

Published: Mar. 19, 2021 at 10:34 AM PDT. Ill. (KWQC) - On Thursday, March 18, Illinois Governor JB Pritzker announced his administration would extend the individual income tax filing and payment ...

Ill. (KWQC) - On Thursday, March 18, Illinois Governor JB Pritzker announced his administration would extend the individual income tax filing and payment deadline from April 15 to May 17.

The Illinois Department of Revenue (IDOR) will continue to process tax refunds for those filing ahead of the deadline.

“The filing extension does not apply to estimated tax payments that are due on April 15, 2021,” officials announced on Thursday. “These payments are still due on April 15 and can be based on either 100% of estimated or 90% of actual liability for 2021, or 100% of actual liabilities for 2019 or 2020.”

You can read more from the release below.

According to IDOR, 2.4 million taxpayers have already filed their individual income tax returns to date. Over 79% of the taxpayers that have already filed are expecting a refund this year. Last year, over 6.4 million income tax returns were filed, and 87% of people filed electronically.

“The fastest, most secure way to receive a refund is to file tax returns electronically and request a direct deposit into a checking or savings account,” said David Harris, Director of the Illinois Department of Revenue. “The filing extension for individual income tax takes effect automatically, so no further action is required by taxpayers to take advantage. For taxpayers awaiting a refund, utilize IDOR’s Where’s My Refund? to locate specific information about the status of any refund due.”

Free filing of Form IL-1040 is available through MyTax Illinois. Individuals may also utilize MyTax Illinois to make payments, respond to department inquiries, and check the status of their Illinois Individual Income Tax refunds using the Where’s My Refund? link. Taxpayers may also look up IL-PINs, amounts of any estimated tax payments made, and (when necessary) amounts reported on Form 1099-G with MyTax Illinois.

For the most up-to-date information, forms, schedules, and instructions for the 2020 tax year, please visit IDOR’s website at: tax.illinois.gov.

Copyright 2021 KWQC. All rights reserved.

Illinois taxes deadlines extended due to COVID-19

Illinois is extending the 2019 tax year filing and payment due date for C corporations who file Form IL-1120 from April 15, 2020 to July 15, 2020. Illinois is not extending the filing or payment due dates for tax year 2019 returns for partnerships, including nonresident withholding (Form IL-1065), which still falls on April 15, 2020.

The Illinois Department of Revenue announced in Informational Bulletin FY 2020-24 (“Bulletin 2020-24”) that the tax filing and income tax payment deadlines for 2019 “individual returns, trusts, and corporations” were being automatically extended from April 15, 2020 to July 15, 2020. 

The department has not yet formally confirmed whether the July 15, 2020 deadline for filing and paying tax also applies to either replacement tax or pass-through withholding tax, given that the language of Bulletin 2020-24 refers exclusively to “income tax” payments.  However, in response to questions from practitioners, the department has informally made the following clarifications:

  • Illinois is extending the 2019 tax year filing and payment due date for C corporations who file Form IL-1120 from April 15, 2020 to July 15, 2020.
  • Illinois is not extending the filing or payment due dates for tax year 2019 returns for partnerships, including nonresident withholding (Form IL-1065), which still falls on April 15, 2020.
  • Illinois is not extending the due date of an already extended income tax return tax return and payment for fiscal year taxpayers whose extended due date would otherwise be April 15, 2020 must still file and pay on that date).

Illinois’ 2020 quarterly estimated tax payment

Bulletin 2020-24 explains that its’ relief “does NOT impact the first and second installments of estimated payments for 2020 taxes that are due April 15 and June 15.”

On April 2, 2020 Illinois published Informational Bulletin FY 2020-26 (“Bulletin 2020-26”) to explain the relief that Illinois would provide.

In Bulletin 2020-26, Illinois authorized taxpayers to base their 2020 estimated tax payments upon 100% of the taxpayers’ estimated 2020 liability or 100% of their actual 2018 or 2019 liability. 

In addition, taxpayers who timely pay in four equal installments  will avoid late payment penalties if they base their installments upon the lesser of (1) 90% of their 2020 estimated liability or (2) 100% of their actual 2018 or 2019 liability.

  • Calculating 2020 quarterly estimates based on 100% of 2018 liability for taxpayers who have not filed for 2019

According to Bulletin 2020-26, individuals who want to compute their 2020 estimated tax payments using 100% of their 2018 liability should use Form IL-1040-ES and base their 2020 estimated tax on the amount of tax they owed on 2018 Form IL-1040.

Businesses who want to compute their 2020 estimated tax payments using 100% of their 2018 liability should use the Form IL-1120 instructions, Appendix B, or IL-990-T instructions, Appendix A, to calculate their estimated payment amount and base their 2020 estimated tax on the amount of tax they owed on their 2018 return.

Taxpayers who wish to base their 2020 Illinois quarterly estimates upon 100% of their 2018 or 2019 liability should keep in mind that their expected 2020 payroll tax withholdings should be netted against their gross tax liability in order to compute the quarterly estimates.

  • Applying 2019 overpayments towards 2020 quarterly estimated taxes

Many Illinois taxpayers and practitioners have asked whether they could defer payment of their Illinois 2020 Q1 or Q2 estimates until July 15 by overpaying their Illinois extension payment on July 15, 2020, and retroactively applying that overpayment back to the April 15 and June 15 estimates in a way that would cause those estimates to have been timely paid. According to Bulletin 2020-26, however, overpayments shown on a 2019 return filed on July 15, 2020 will not be considered timely applied to a taxpayer’s 2020 Q1 or Q2 estimates to the extent the overpayment was comprised of payments received after April 15, 2020.

What’s next

Illinois is one of a minority of states who that has not followed the IRS’ approach of extending the due date of 2020 Q1 estimates to July 15, 2020.  In addition, its’ guidance regarding allowances for computing 2020 quarterly estimates was published less than two weeks before the due date of Illinois’ Q1 2020 estimate.  Even though this combination of factors is sure to raise questions, the department is unlikely to significantly clarify these issues prior to April 15. 

With the April 15, 2020 deadline coming up soon for all taxpayers’ 2020 Q1 estimates, as well as for the 2019 returns for partnerships, taxpayers should consult with their Wipfli tax advisor to evaluate the best approach for filing and paying these taxes.

Related content:

mondaq.com

The Internal Revenue Service and the State of Illinois have officially moved the 2020 income tax filing deadline for individuals to May 17, 2021 from April 15, 2021. Individual taxpayers can also postpone Federal and Illinois income tax payments due for the 2020 tax year to May 17, 2021 without incurring additional penalties or interest.

IRS will delay tax filing due date until May 17

18-03-2021 · Mar 17, 2021 at 7:35 PM Americans will be getting extra time to prepare their taxes. The Internal Revenue Service says it’s delaying the traditional tax filing deadline from April 15 until May 17....

18-03-2021
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Americans will be getting extra time to prepare their taxes. The Internal Revenue Service says it’s delaying the traditional tax filing deadline from April 15 until May 17.

The IRS announced the decision Wednesday and said it would provide further guidance in the coming days. The move provides more breathing room for taxpayers and the IRS alike to cope with changes brought on by the pandemic.

“The IRS wants to continue to do everything possible to help taxpayers navigate the unusual circumstances related to the pandemic, while also working on important tax administration responsibilities,” IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig said in a statement.

The decision postpones when individual taxpayers must file their return and when their payment is due. The IRS said taxpayers who owe money would not face any further penalties or interest if they pay by May 17. The new deadline also applies to individuals who pay self-employment tax.

Taxpayers do not need to take any action to take advantage of the new deadline. Those who need more time beyond May 17 can request an extension until October 15.

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The new deadline does not apply to estimated tax payments that are due on April 15; those remain due by that day.

The decision to extend the deadline comes after an intense year for the chronically underfunded IRS. The pandemic hit in the middle of last year’s tax filing season, setting the agency back in terms of processing. The IRS has also been a key player in doling out government relief payments, and is currently helping to send out the third round of payments in the middle of the current tax filing season.

Additionally, the extension gives the IRS time to issue guidance on recent tax law changes. The American Rescue Plan excludes the first ,200 of unemployment benefits from federal taxes for those making less than 0,000.

“Never before has the law changed so substantially in the middle of tax filing season,” Patrick Thomas, director of Notre Dame Law School’s Tax Clinic, said in a statement.

The IRS must issue guidance for taxpayers and tax preparers alike as millions of returns already filed likely do not account for this change.

[Most read] Daily horoscope for April 10, 2022 »

A number of lawmakers and professionals from the tax community have urged the tax filing season be extended to accommodate for these pressures. The House Ways and Means Committee applauded the move.

“This extension is absolutely necessary to give Americans some needed flexibility in a time of unprecedented crisis,” said Chairman Richard Neal, D-Mass. and Rep. Bill Pascrell Jr., D-N.J., chairman of the panel’s oversight subcommittee.

Rettig is expected to speak to the committee tomorrow about how the IRS is managing this filing season and the need for this extension.

The IRS continues to urge people to file as soon as possible, particularly those who are owed refunds. In some cases filing will help taxpayers more quickly get any remaining relief payments they are entitled to.

AP Economics Writer Martin Crutsinger contributed to this report from Washington.

mytax.illinois.gov

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ides.illinois.gov

Quarterly Filing Requirements. Employers must file wage reports ( Form UI-3/40 ) and pay contributions in the month after the close of each calendar quarter - that is, on or before April 30, July 31, October 31, and January 31. It is an employer’s responsibility to file the proper forms on time either electronically or via obtaining paper forms on this site.

Illinois income tax deadline extended to May 17, following ...

This is the second year in a row the IRS and state have moved the filing deadline back to accommodate complications related to the COVID-19 pandemic. In 2020, the income tax filing deadline was ...

SPRINGFIELD — Illinois is following the lead of the Internal Revenue Service and extending the filing deadline for individual income taxes to May 17.

The Illinois Department of Revenue reports of 2.4 million people in Illinois have already filed their income taxes for the past year. Seventy-nine percent of those who have already filed are expecting a refund from the state this year.

April 15 is typically the required deadline for filing individual income taxes.

"The filing extension for individual income tax takes effect automatically, so no further action is required by taxpayers to take advantage. For taxpayers awaiting a refund, utilize IDOR's Where's My Refund? to locate specific information about the status of any refund due," IDOR director David Harris said in a statement.

Harris also said the fastest and most secure way to receive a refund on a tax return is to file electronically and request a direct deposit to a bank account.

Estimated tax payments will still be due on April 15.

Last year, over 6.4 million individual income tax returns were filed and 87% filed them online.

This is the second year in a row the IRS and state have moved the filing deadline back to accommodate complications related to the COVID-19 pandemic. In 2020, the income tax filing deadline was pushed back to July 15.

Illinois reopening plan: What to know about the latest updates

Pritzker said all Illinois residents 16 and older would be eligible for the vaccine on April 12, ending the state's phased-in priority distribution. 

On that day, all state-supported mass vaccination sites, local health departments, pharmacy partners — every jurisdiction that receives vaccine from the state's allocation — will be instructed to move to widespread eligibility.

Photo by Mary Altaffer, Associated Press

Officials in Chicago might not follow the state's lead on expanded vaccine eligibility April 12. The city gets its own pool of vaccine directly from the federal government and sets its own rules.

Mayor Lori Lightfoot said Wednesday that the city would expand the vaccine pool on March 29 to include people with additional health concerns and people in essential industries such as food service and construction. There's no decision on when the city might open vaccination appointments to all.

Photo by Ashlee Rezin Garcia, Chicago Sun-Times via AP

All of Illinois is currently in Phase 4 of the state's reopening plan.

On Thursday, Pritzker introduced a new “bridge phase” for expanding capacity limits while remaining short of Phase 5, when the state will fully reopen.

This transitional period will start after 70% of residents 65 and over have received at least one dose of the vaccine. Pritzker said the state is now at 58% for that age group.

Photo by Pat Nabong, Chicago Sun-Times via AP

Under the bridge guidelines:

  • Social events could be held with 250 people attending indoors or 500 people outdoors. 
  • Spectator events and theater productions could be held at 60% capacity. 
  • Meetings, conferences and conventions could be held at 60% capacity or 1,000 people, whichever is less. 
  • Zoos, museums and amusement parks could open at 60% capacity, up from the current 25%. 
  • For restaurants, standing areas would change from 25% capacity to 30% capacity indoors and 50% capacity outdoors. In seated areas, customers would still need to be seated 6 feet apart and in groups of 10 or less.
  • Health and fitness facilities, retail stores, offices and personal care businesses would increase from 50% capacity to 60% capacity. 

Click here for a full breakdown of bridge capacity changes. 

Photo by Pat Nabong, Chicago Sun-Times via AP

All local governments, including Chicago, have the option of keeping stricter conditions than the state.

Pritzker said he hoped Chicago would follow the state's guidance on reopening and move quickly to reduce restrictions. 

Photo by Pat Nabong, Chicago Sun-Times via AP

Normal business operations will be reintroduced during Phase 5 of the Restore Illinois plan.

This will begin after half of all residents 16 and older are vaccinated, and if there are no significant setbacks in terms of cases, hospitalizations or deaths after 28 days in the bridge program.

Currently, 28% of all residents 16 and older have had at least one dose of the vaccine, Pritzker said. 

Pritzker would not guess at dates when the transitions might occur. 

Photo by Pat Nabong, Chicago Sun Times via AP

Pritzker said mask requirements will remain in place until the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends lifting them. 

"Masks have been one of our best ways to reduce risk in this pandemic and we won't be foolish in throwing away our best weapon heading into the last lap of this fight," he said.

The Chicago Tribune and Associated Press contributed. 

Photo by Pat Nabong, Chicago Sun-Times via AP

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scheffelboyle.com

Governor Pritzker announced today, March 25th, that the State of Illinois income tax filing and balance due payment deadline has been extended for 2019 returns to July 15th, 2020.. However, for Illinois, 1st quarter estimates are still due on April 15th, 2020, and 2nd quarter estimates are still due on June 15th, 2020.This decision does not mirror Federal, …

Governor Pritzker announced today, March 25th, that the State of Illinois income tax filing and balance due payment deadline has been extended for 2019 returns to July 15th, 2020.

However, for Illinois, 1st quarter estimates are still due on April 15th, 2020, and 2nd quarter estimates are still due on June 15th, 2020. This decision does not mirror Federal, Missouri, and a number of other states, as Federal and Missouri 1st quarter estimates are not due until July 15th, 2020.

Although the IRS, Illinois, Missouri, and others have extended SOME filing due dates, it’s important to note that you can still file your return, process payment, and/or receive your refund now, if you so wish.

If you have Illinois estimates due April 15th, 2020, we need to either prepare your 2019 return or estimate your 2020 taxable income. Penalties for underpayment of Illinois taxes can be substantial in relation to the tax due. We suggest that you still get your tax information to us as soon as possible.

Our team will continue to monitor this situation and communicate with our clients as regulatory updates are announced. Please reach out to us with any questions you may have. We are always here to help.

To read the official release from the Illinois Department of Revenue, click here.

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paulweiss.com

Illinois: Delay of State Income Tax Filing Deadline . Description of Program and Relief . In light of COVID -19, the Illinois Department of Revenue has extended the deadline to file state income tax returns to July 15, 2020. Government or Lead Agency . Illinois State Governor & Department of Revenue. Dates Available

isss.illinois.edu

All resident and nonresident aliens for tax purposes who earned income in the State of Illinois in 2020 must complete and file Illinois Form 1040. If you worked in another state in 2020, then you will need to file a return for that state.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will never contact you by email, text or social media. If the IRS needs information, they will contact you by mail. Avoid scammers pretending to be the IRS by following these steps.

Filing Tax Returns

As a Foreign National student or scholar, you may need to file tax forms each year with the IRS by May 17th, even if you earned no income. It is your individual responsibility to understand and meet your tax obligations.

U.S. tax laws can be complex and the laws that apply to foreign nationals are not the same as those that apply to U.S. citizens. This page is meant to serve as a general introduction. ISSS staff are not able to give tax advice about individual cases as we are not tax professionals. These resources and best practices should help you to better understand your tax obligation, to learn what and where to research, and to successfully submit your tax forms.

Resources

Best practices To File your Taxes

  • File your tax return as early as possible. The last day to file your tax return is April 18, 2022.
  • Mail your tax return directly from the post office.
  • Be aware of scams. The IRS will not contact you by email, text or social media. They will contact you by mail.

IRS IMPERSONATION SCAM:

This scam is targeting individuals associated with educational institutions, specifically students and staff who have an “.edu” email address. The phishing emails seemingly come from “irs.gov”, display an impressive, yet fake IRS logo and use various subject lines, such as “Tax Refund Payment” or “Recalculation of your tax refund payment.” The email directs the individual to click on a link and submit personal information to claim their tax refund. “IRS-impersonation” scam that is targeting individuals associated with educational institutions, specifically students and staff who have an “.edu” email address. The phishing emails seemingly come from “irs.gov”, display an impressive, yet fake IRS logo and use various subject lines, such as “Tax Refund Payment” or “Recalculation of your tax refund payment.” The email directs the individual to click on a link and submit personal information to claim their tax refund.

INDIVIDUALS WHO RECEIVE THIS SCAM EMAIL SHOULD NOT CLICK ON ANY LINK IN THE EMAIL.

As a reminder, the IRS will NOT initiate email contact with a taxpayer without consent. The 2020 tax return is the first year that the IRS has included the option for the taxpayer to insert an email address. IF the taxpayer inserts an email address, the IRS may choose to send an email; however, any email from the IRS will NOT include links to claim a refund or ask for any secure information such as social security number, date of birth or bank account information.

The IRS asks that individuals who receive such an email to please send it to them. For security reasons, they should not forward the email, rather they should save the email using “save as” and then send that as an attachment to [email protected] or forward the email as an attachment to [email protected] .

GLACIER Tax Prep

GLACIER Tax Prep© is a web-based tax return preparation system designed exclusively for foreign students, scholars, and others. Access information will be sent to students and scholars by mid-February. If you do not receive this e-mail, please contact ISSS. Please also make sure that you check your spam filters to add our email address (students) [email protected]/(scholars) [email protected], to ensure that you receive all emails regarding GLACIER Tax Prep. Access to GLACIER Tax Prep will expire in June.

Fulbright sponsored J-1s should not use the GLACIER Tax Prep. All other non-University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign sponsored J-1 should check with their program sponsors to determine if they will provide them with assistance first.

Frequently Asked Questions

Yes, all international students and scholars as well as their dependents are required to file at least one tax form for every year they are present in the U.S. regardless of whether or not they earned any money. This does not necessarily mean you have to pay taxes.

Both Federal (U.S. government) and State of Illinois tax returns are due on May 17, 2021.

If your scholarship is from sources inside the United States, the portion of your scholarship used for room and board as well as for other "non-educational expenses" is taxed at a flat rate. Individuals from countries with which the U.S. has negotiated tax treaties may be able to reduce the amount of tax on their scholarships. The portion of your U.S. scholarship granted and used to pay tuition and required fees is exempt from U.S. tax. You will receive Form 1042-S from your sponsor to report the taxable portion of your scholarship. If your scholarship is provided by an entity outside the United States you will not pay taxes to the U.S. on your scholarship. Check with your sponsor to determine if you have any U.S. tax obligations on your scholarship.

Yes. The U.S. tax system is based on self-reporting of income. The law requires U.S. employers to withhold a standard percentage of tax from each employee and to pay that tax to the U.S. government. Individuals must file a tax return at the end of each year to determine whether they owe additional taxes or if their employer deducted too much tax and request a refund from the U.S. government.

This depends on your tax status. Generally, nonresident international students and scholars use form 1040-NR for their Federal (U.S. government) taxes. "NR" means non-resident for tax purposes. Individuals who are residents for tax purposes use the same 1040 forms as U.S. citizens or Legal Permanent Residents. GLACIER Tax Prep software will determine if you are a resident or a nonresident for tax purposes. All F and J international students and scholars (including dependents – F2 or J2) who had no US income must file Form 8843.

  • Form 1040NR, U.S. Nonresident Alien Income Tax Return or
  • Form 8843

GLACIER Tax Prep© is a web-based tax return preparation system designed exclusively for foreign students, scholars, teachers, researchers, trainees, and their dependents to aid in preparing U.S. federal income tax forms (returns) 1040-NR and 8843.

Access to GLACIER Tax Prep will be done via Sunapsis. ISSS will send you an email in February with the instructions on how to access the software.

No, once you have used the GLACIER Tax Prep software, you cannot be issued a refund.

Generally, F-1 and J-1 students are considered nonresidents for tax purposes for five calendar years regardless of date of entry (e.g., Anna enters the U.S. as a F-1 Student on August 6, 2016, she will remain in Nonresident Alien Tax Status through December 31, 2020). This period is shortened to two calendar years for J-1 Research Scholars and Professors. Visit the IRS Substantial Presence Test webpage for more information. Your tax status (nonresident or resident) is separate from your immigration status. You may be a resident for tax purposes even though you are still a non-resident for immigration purposes. GLACIER Tax Prep will automatically determine your residency status for tax purposes. Foreign Nationals who are considered residents for tax purposes should not use GLACIER Tax Prep.

Before you begin the filing process, be sure you have all the following information available:

  • Form W-2 Wage and Tax Statement
  • Form 1042-S
  • Form 1099 (if applicable): The 1099 form documents miscellaneous income. For example, if you had CPT authorization to work as an independent contractor, rather than as an employee of an organization, you might receive Form 1099 instead of Form W-2 to document your earnings.
  • Passport
  • I-20 (F-1 status) or DS-2019 (J-1 or J-2 status)
  • Social Security number or Individual Tax Identification number (generally not required if you will file only Form 8843)
  • Address information (current U.S. address and foreign address)
  • U.S. entry and exit dates for current and past visits to U.S.
  • Academic institution or host sponsor information (name, address, phone)
  • Scholarship/fellowship grant letter (if any)
  • A copy of the previous year's federal income tax return, if filed

Form W-2 is a summary of total wages earned in the U.S. and taxes withheld for the calendar year. Form 1042S summarizes taxable scholarships and fellowships and any income exempt from tax under a tax treaty.

The University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (or your employer for OPT or CPT) will mail a paper W-2 and/or paper 1042-S forms via the U.S. Postal Service. The university also offers employees the option to receive their W-2 and/or 1042-S form electronically. If you are employed by the university you may access your W-2 online via NESSIE. Information about requesting duplicate tax forms, wages and withholdings information can be found on the OBFS payroll webpage.

If all of your employment-based income was exempt from tax under a tax treaty or if you only received a scholarship or a fellowship, then you will not receive a W-2. If you had taxes withheld from employment-based income and have not received your Form W-2 by January 31st, contact your employer(s).

F-1 and J-1 nonresident aliens are exempt from FICA (Social Security and Medicare) taxes on wages earned from legal employment in the United States. If your employer withheld FICA taxes in error, you can request a refund from your employer first. If your employer refuses, please file the appropriate tax forms (Form 843) with the IRS to request a refund from the government. Please contact the IRS or a tax professional for assistance. Wages earned by those in H-1B and J-2 status are not exempt from FICA taxes.

The U.S. has negotiated tax treaties with many countries of the world. If you are a resident of a country that has a tax treaty with the U.S., you may be eligible to reduce or eliminate U.S. tax on your income. If you are eligible for a tax treaty benefit, more tax treaty information can be found IRS tax treaties webpage. The Office of Business and Financial Services can assist Foreign Nationals with tax treaty benefit analysis. Please visit the OBFS website.

All resident and nonresident aliens for tax purposes who earned income in the State of Illinois in 2020 must complete and file Illinois Form 1040. If you worked in another state in 2020, then you will need to file a return for that state. You may be able to use an additional software, Sprintax, to complete your IL 1040, but it will cost an additional fee. Please note that the State of Illinois considers the term “nonresidents” as someone who has lived in a different U.S. state other than Illinois.

In addition to your Federal tax return you must complete a tax return for each state in which you worked during the year. If you worked in the State of Illinois and another state during the year, you'll need to file “part-year resident” forms for the other state(s) where you worked during the year. Multiple state tax returns can become complicated because you must report total income earned during the year to both states then calculate a prorated amount of tax applicable to the earnings from each state. If you need assistance please contact a tax professional.

1040-NR Tax Returns may be submitted to the IRS via e-file or mail.

If you are e-filing, please review https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/i1040nr.pdf

If you are not enclosing a payment, mail 1040-NR to:

Department of the Treasury Internal Revenue Service Austin, TX 73301-0215

U.S.A.

If you are enclosing a payment, mail 1040-NR to:

Internal Revenue Service P.O. Box 1303 Charlotte, NC 28201-1303

U.S.A.

State tax forms should be mailed to the address indicated on the tax form instructions for the state(s) in which you worked during the year.

If you were present in the U.S. in F or J immigration status during the year but had no U.S. source of income, you must file Form 8843 by June 15, 2021.

Yes. If you were in the U.S. in F or J status for even 1 day during the tax year, you must file Form 8843 by June 15, 2021.

If you have no tax liability, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will not penalize you if you do not file (although you must still file Form 8843). However, the terms of your visa require that you stay in compliance with all laws of the United States, including income tax filing. If you want to apply for permanent residence in the U.S. at a later date you will be asked to prove that you have complied with all tax laws. If you owe additional tax for the year, you must file a return and pay those taxes on time to avoid late fees. The IRS charges substantial interest and penalties on past due taxes.

Not legally. If you are a non-resident alien you must file 1040NR. Failure to file the correct form is fraud and can place your immigration status in jeopardy. The additional money you might receive is not worth the trouble.

Please contact a tax professional for assistance. The rules for non-residents are different from those for Americans.

If you have questions regarding tax issues, tax forms or anything in regards to federal taxes, please visit the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) website or contact them by phone Toll free at 1-800-829- 1040 or (217)782-3336. You may also call the Philadelphia Office at (267) 941-1000. This is not a toll-free number, but the operators are familiar with nonresident tax issues. Hours of operation: Monday – Friday, 7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.

For State of Illinois tax inquiries, please visit the State Tax Commission website or contact them by phone Toll free at 1-800-732-8866. Hours of operation: Monday – Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

An ITIN is an Individual Tax Identification Number. The IRS issues ITINs to foreign nationals who have federal tax reporting requirements but are not eligible for a social security number. There are several ways to apply for an ITIN, including visiting a Certified Authorized Agent in the Champaign-Urbana area. More information about ITINs can be found on the IRS website. A list of local Certified Authorized Agents has been provided by Student Legal Services and can be accessed by following these steps from the Dean of Students .

It may take up to four months.

Please use the helpful websites listed in this page for assistance. If your question is related to GLACIER Tax Prep please use the resources available in their Menu page.

If you are concerned that you will not make the May 17th submission deadline for your tax returns, you may be able to request a six-month extension by completing and mailing IRS Form 4868 . For extension requests for State of Illinois State Tax, use IL-505-I .

If you believe that you may have filed the incorrect Federal tax return, call the IRS at 1-800-829- 1040 or (217) 782-3336. They will provide instructions for how to amend your federal tax return. You will most likely need to correct your state tax return, too. Instructions for how to correct your State of Illinois tax return may be found here

Since you had completed the degree requirements and the program end date of your immigration document was not within tax year 2020, you did not receive the email.

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