List of States: M-O

As Maine reinvents its traditional economies and methods of education, this report examines the field of arts education there. It examines Maine's efforts to (1)create a system that encourages and facilitates lifelong learning from infancy through old age for the benefit of individuals, families,

As Maine reinvents its traditional economies and methods of education, this report examines the field of arts education there. It examines Maine's efforts to (1)create a system that encourages and facilitates lifelong learning from infancy through old age for the benefit of individuals, families, communities, and the state as a whole, (2)place a strong and sustained emphasis on creativity and innovation in the classroom, and (3)leverage both formal and informal settings for education. More than a third of Maine's arts educators at nearly half of the state's schools filled out a survey about their programs and the realities of teaching the arts today. In light of these findings, a group of arts educators in Maine has come up with some ambitious suggestions for the future of this field. Read the complete study here.

There has not been a comprehensive study of the arts in Michigan until now, and the Arts Alive survey aims to remedy that. Districts, administrators, and educators are creative in their pursuit of funding for arts education, and there is a wide variety of arts activities taking place in schools and with community partners. Many more school districts can benefit from adopting comprehensive arts education policies, and there is a call for a rise in the number of certified arts specialists in the fields of music and visual arts. Due to a severe shortage of qualified teachers, few students in Michigan's public schools have the chance to explore the performing arts. Over ninety-five percent of the responding schools did not employ a dance teacher, and of those, only 146 teach dance. When it comes to hiring visual arts teachers, there is also a wide gap between different public school districts, public school academies, and private schools. Adequate facilities (52%), materials and supplies (43%), and sufficient scheduling time (38%) were ranked as the three most critical needs in their districts or schools. Statistics show that respondents are strongly committed to the value of arts education in schools, and the survey shows a positive trend among schools to maintain or increase arts education offerings in the next 1-3 years. Fewer than 4% of those polled plan to cut back on arts education. Find out everything that was discovered by reading the full report.

Most primary and secondary schools provided instruction in two art forms, while most tertiary institutions did so in three. In Michigan, 108,000 students lack access to quality arts education. Funding for high schools is typically higher ($4 than in the primary ($1 67) as well as junior highs ($2 74) As a whole, the median cost per school was $2. dollars nine per student per academic year Eighty-eight percent of schools meet or exceed the statewide minimum of one art credit for graduation, while twelve percent fall short. Read the complete study here.
 

There was a lot of talk in the early 2000s about the importance of arts education in public schools, but not much information about how widespread it actually was. The Minnesota Arts Education Research Project was initiated by the Perpich Center for Arts Education in the 2010–2011 school year in response to this need, with funding from the Minnesota State Legislature's Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund of the Clean Water, Land, and Legacy Amendment. This study set out to collect, analyze, and share quantitative data on art education across the state. The goal of the Research Project was to conduct a statewide voluntary survey to collect data on arts education in every school, and then use those results in conjunction with other data to provide a comprehensive picture of arts education across the state. Herein is a synopsis of recent developments in arts education, educational policy, and instructional practice. The goal is to give policymakers and the public a comprehensive picture of arts education in Minnesota. An Overview [Introduction, p 2) Check out the complete study!
 

Eighty-one percent of respondents to the 2006 Status of Arts Education survey said that the curriculum in their district follows the 2003 Visual and Performing Arts Framework in Mississippi. In 2006-2007, 23% of schools reported an increase in the percentage of students enrolled in art classes. There are currently 22 certified visual arts teachers and 20 certified music teachers in Mississippi, where students are required to take one unit in the arts in order to graduate from high school. Local educational agencies (LEAs) look to various funding sources (such as grants, the local community, and individual schools) in order to provide arts education to their students. Examine the complete study here.

A review of "core" data submitted by public school districts in Missouri to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education reveals a strong correlation between exposure to the arts and improved academic outcomes like test scores, attendance, and graduation rates, as well as reduced rates of suspensions and expulsions for more serious infractions. Read the complete study here.

Statewide arts education assessments were finalized in Utah, Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana for the 2009-10 school year. The arts were not considered a core subject in over half of the districts in three of the states, and the ratio of students to art teachers was extremely high and difficult. Only in Utah did dance education exist to any significant extent, and that state also saw the largest increase in student arts participation of the four. Despite a 1% increase in enrollment across the state, the average number of dancers in Wyoming's schools has dropped by 8. 26 percent, and overall music classes saw a 5 percent drop. 30% According to data from the Montana Arts Education Assessment, elementary schools primarily provide exposure to music (at 86% enrollment) and visual arts (61% enrollment) but only rarely provide exposure to theater (at 5%) and dance (3%) Only 43% of respondents consider the arts to be an essential part of their curriculum, and 11% do not provide any sort of arts education at all. The state of Idaho has adopted Humanities content standards to outline the skills and recommended content for grades K-12, and this mirrors the national situation where arts education is considered a core academic subject and is included as a two-credit high school graduation requirement. Take a look at the complete study.

The data in this report comes from 313 of Montana's 847 public elementary, middle, and high schools and provides a snapshot of the state of arts education in Montana. This data represents the perspectives of principals, superintendents, and heads of schools on the state of arts education in their respective districts. Look at the complete study.

There were 43 total responses to the survey for the New Hampshire Arts Education Data Project Report. 153 institutions (6%) The arts are mandated by law in New Hampshire as an important part of a well-rounded education. One hundred percent of secondary schools and ninety-eight percent of primary and secondary schools offer some form of arts education. Eighty-eight percent of elementary school children take some sort of music or art class at least once a week for about 50 minutes. More than half of high school students are enrolled in at least one arts course, and 73% of high schools offer more than the minimum one-half credit in the arts required for graduation. Thirty percent of schools had some sort of relationship with an artist in residence, and many schools cited artist in residence programs as the most effective arts integration strategy they employ. Reports indicate that all schools receive funding from outside sources to support arts education, with 54% coming from parent/teacher associations and 2% from local businesses and corporations. However, only 2% of elementary schools in New Hampshire offer at least one course in theatre, and only 6% offer at least one course in dance. Only 6% of middle schools provide any kind of media arts education. In the United States, 67% of schools spend $20 or less on arts education each year per student, and 15% spend $1 or less. Check out the complete study here.

The goals of this new initiative were to: conduct a statewide survey to collect data on arts education in every school in the state; combine survey results with other data to provide a comprehensive picture of arts education; widely disseminate survey results; and develop a replicable model for implementing arts education in other states. states; and create an ongoing system to update keep up and disperse data on art education throughout the state Take a look at the complete study.

In 2011, nearly all New Jersey public school students (97%) had access to music and visual arts classes. There has been a 54,000 increase in the number of New Jersey students who have daily access to the arts since 2006. The percentage of New Jersey schools adopting a common curriculum has risen from 81% in 2006 to 97% in 2011. More than 90 percent of schools exclusively rely on certified arts specialists to teach students in the areas of music and the visual arts. Nonetheless, few public schools provide education in all four of the arts. There is a significant shortage of trained professionals in both the theater and dance fields; fewer than 60% of teachers in the former are certified in their respective fields. Spending per student on the arts has decreased by 30% in elementary schools and 44% in high schools, and more than 25% of schools have had to use extra funding to make up the difference. The number of field trips, assemblies, and partnerships between schools and New Jersey cultural organizations has decreased, as has the number of students enrolled in arts courses, particularly at the elementary level. You should check out the complete report.

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act promotes arts education by mandating that states provide funding for elementary schools to provide students with opportunities to engage in the visual arts, music, theater, and dance. The purpose of this report is to provide a basis for evaluating the Fine Arts Education Act's (FAEA) influence on New Mexico's public elementary schools since its passage in 2003. The report suggests 1) helping districts and charter schools set up and maintain Parent Advisory Councils when asked, and 2) finding and organizing useful professional development (PD) programs for school systems. and 3) making it easier to apply by streamlining the RfA and making it uniform so that applications can be reviewed quickly and data can be collected efficiently. Read the complete study here.

In New York City's public schools, arts education has become unequal and underfunded despite core arts instruction mandates. Federal and state accountability systems that fail to acknowledge the value of the arts have led to disinvestments and disincentives in arts education. Spending on bringing in artists and cultural groups to schools has dropped by 47%, and the report also shows a significant drop in funding for art supplies and equipment. There is widespread misallocation of schools' supplemental arts funding to other purposes. Many urban schools are operating outside of state law, which has led to significant inequalities in educational quality. While 419 (28%) schools only have one certified art teacher, 306 (20%) schools have none at all. South Bronx and Central Brooklyn are home to over 42% of the city's schools that are understaffed due to a lack of full- or part-time teachers. This report recommends that the Department of Education increase the accountability framework, make it possible for every school to employ at least one arts teacher, reach out to more potential cultural partners, and provide sufficient funding to ensure that all city schools offer high-quality arts education to their students. Check out the complete report here.

This report recommends that the Department of Education increase the accountability framework, make it possible for every school to employ at least one arts teacher, reach out to more potential cultural partners, and allocate sufficient funds to make sure all city schools can offer a high-quality arts education to their students. Arts education in New York City's public schools has become unequal and underfunded despite mandates for core arts instruction. Federal and state accountability systems that fail to recognize the value of the arts have resulted in reduced funding for and support for arts education. Spending on arts and cultural organizations to provide educational services has dropped by 47%, and spending on arts supplies and equipment has fallen even more precipitously, according to a new report. Schools frequently divert extra money meant for the arts to other purposes. Inequalities in education quality are exacerbated by the fact that many city schools are flouting state regulations. While 419 (28%) schools only have one certified art teacher, 306 (20%) schools have none at all. South Bronx and Central Brooklyn account for over 42% of the city's schools that are understaffed. This report recommends that the Department of Education increase the accountability framework, make it possible for every school to employ at least one arts teacher, reach out to more potential cultural partners, and allocate sufficient funds to make sure all city schools can offer a high-quality arts education to their students. Go here to read the complete report.

As of the 2009-2010 school year, 93% of Ohio's public schools offered some form of arts education. There were 54,700 students in the state's public schools who did not have access to arts instruction, and 10% of urban public schools did not provide access to the arts. Only a minority of public schools provided instruction in more than two arts disciplines for those students who had access to such instruction. Only 1% of schools provided courses in all four art forms (dance, music, theater, and visual arts). Art classes in Ohio's public schools primarily focus on music and visual arts, while dance and theater are rarely offered. There is a high rate of credentialing among Ohio's art educators. While 83% of teachers held licenses in the subjects they taught, only 64% of schools offered arts-related professional development. Schools in Ohio have reported that they are more likely to implement the state's art learning standards (90%) and that they are more likely to assess students in the arts (94%). Eighty-four percent of high schools reported that they valued art class grades the same as other classes. Schools reported that there was no district-level arts coordinator in 78 percent of cases. Check out the complete report here.

Ohio's State Board of Education has set as its goal "for all students to graduate from the pre-K-12 education system with the knowledge, skills, and behaviors necessary to be well prepared for success." This study expands on Ohio's ongoing commitment to the value of arts education and its place in the state's educational system. This report serves as a starting point for anyone interested in learning more about the state of arts education in Ohio's public schools and districts, including funding levels, resource allocation, and potential areas for improvement. It focuses on the people, resources, and policies at the state and local levels that affect the delivery of arts education and the distribution of arts funding in Ohio. Consider the state of Ohio, where 83% of public schools had teachers who were certified to instruct in one or more art forms. Eighty-four percent of schools in the survey also regularly used arts assessments that teachers had created. Look at the complete study.

Eighty percent of the state's public schools' data are included in this report, which accounts for ninety-one percent of the state's student population and access to music education. The range of musical offerings from school to school in Oklahoma is wide, but virtually all schools offer at least one type of music class. While elementary schools are the most likely to offer general music, they also tend to offer a narrower range of subjects. There is greater course variety in high school, but fewer electives in general, including music. For students who are interested in music but need a broad introduction to the field, this is a problem. The availability of resources varies depending on factors such as location, school size, community wealth, and the number of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunches. Read the complete study here.

Even though eighty percent of Oregon's K-12 public schools offer regular, stand-alone arts courses, ten percent of Oregon's K-12 public school students did not have access to arts instruction at their school. The lack of access to arts education is most pronounced at the elementary school level, where 27% of schools do not offer any arts instruction as standalone courses. Nearly all middle schools (98%) offered some sort of art class, and nearly all middle schoolers (98% combined) went to a school that did so as well. While 86% of high schools offered some sort of arts education, only 6% offered courses in all five art forms (dance, music, theater, media, and visual arts). Seventy-four percent of schools offered music classes, followed by sixteen percent for theater, thirteen percent for media arts, and two percent for dance. Read the complete study here.

This report compiles statistics from the Oregon Department of Education and details opportunities for students to learn in, through, and about the arts in the Beaver State. There is an opportunity for a targeted investment to have an effect on schools with a demonstrated need when it is known that nearly 65,000 students attend a public school in Oregon without access to any arts coursework taught by a licensed arts teacher. This year's report includes a map by county that details the different access points in the state. The report, in conjunction with the existing interactive database on the Oregon Arts Commission website, offers a valuable opportunity to study the methods used by schools that have shown a dedication to arts education access. Check out the detailed report.

Ranking The 50 Friendliest States In The U.S.
Ranking The 50 Friendliest States In The U.S.

It seems that not all states are created equal when it comes to friendliness. There is a wide range of politeness, from traditional Southern hospitality to the blunt rudeness of big city dwellers. Listeners were polled on "what are the friendliest states in America?" ” This is a list of the

Author: Pro Reviewer Author: Pro Reviewer
Posted: 00:24, Monday 30/01/2023
Top 7 States for Water Features
Top 7 States for Water Features

↓ To View This Incredible Video, Keep Reading! There is widespread familiarity with America's five Great Lakes. They are the largest collection of freshwater lakes on Earth, making up 21% of the world's total surface freshwater. Although, there are millions of other lakes in the United

Author: Pro Reviewer Author: Pro Reviewer
Posted: 07:47, Sunday 29/01/2023
States With the Highest Average Home Prices in 2023
States With the Highest Average Home Prices in 2023

The United States is home to the 26th most expensive cost of living in the world, but the prices of necessities can vary significantly from one state to the next.

Author: Pro Reviewer Author: Pro Reviewer
Posted: 06:41, Saturday 28/01/2023
Detailed Map of the United States, Including Capital Cities
Detailed Map of the United States, Including Capital Cities

State capitals, national capitals, and territorial capitals of the United States are all located in the following cities. S unincorporated USA S capital cities of different regions, colonies, and Native American nations Where: in the nation's capital C (formerly known as the District of

Author: Pro Reviewer Author: Pro Reviewer
Posted: 06:38, Saturday 28/01/2023
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