The History of the 50 U.S. State Flags and What They Symbolize

Photographer: Robert Mooney / Getty Images Whether you refer to it as "Old Glory," "the stars and stripes," or something else entirely, the American flag is something that everyone is familiar with. A different story emerges, however, when discussing the flags of the various states. How

U.S. State Flags Photographer: Robert Mooney / Getty Images

Whether you refer to it as "Old Glory," "the stars and stripes," or something else entirely, the American flag is something that everyone is familiar with. A different story emerges, however, when discussing the flags of the various states. How well did you do when shown a flag from a state other than your own? Do you not know your own state's flag? And what exactly do the various flags represent? We'll go over each one individually to help you learn more about the various states. See these stunning images of the American flag to get in the patriotic spirit.

State Flag of Alabama Image by Joseph Sohm/Thinkstock

Alabama's state flag, which was designed in 1895, features a white St. St. Andrew's Cross in a white rectangular background In the words of the Alabama Department of Archives and History, the design was likely created to "preserve in permanent form some of the more distinctive features of the Confederate battle flag." Only four other state flags do not feature the color blue, and one of them is the flag of Alabama. Other examples include the states of California, Maryland, and New Mexico. The one thing every state has in common with Alabama is their stupid laws.

State Flag of Alaska against the sky Stock image by Joseph Sohm

In 1926, when Alaska was still a territory and the Alaska American Legion was working with the governor to push for statehood, they held a contest for children to design a flag. Unanimously, the orphanage in Unalaska selected John "Benny" Benson, 13, who designed the winning flag. His pattern featured eight stars (including the North Star and the Big Dipper) on a blue background to represent the night sky and the Alaskan forget-me-not flower. In his own words, he decided to add the eighth star because "The North Star is for the future of the state of Alaska, the most northerly in the Union." Find out what each state calls its citizens by its official moniker.

Arizona (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition transportation fx/Shutterstock

State flag of Arizona, adopted in 1917, is bicolor. The Arizona Secretary of State claims that the top's 13 red and yellow rays represent the original 13 colonies. Francisco Vázquez de Coronado, a Spanish explorer, visited Arizona in 1540, and his flags inspired these rays' hues. The lower half is a uniform blue, matching that of the United States. S flag The state of Arizona is the leading copper producer in the United States, as depicted by the large copper star in the center. Read on to learn the origins of the state nicknames across the United States.

The Arkansas State Flag flying in the wind By Katherine Welles / Shutterstock

Although the Arkansas state flag appears straightforward at first glance, the Arkansas Secretary of State claims that it is actually quite symbolic. Those patriotic hues (red, white, and blue) represent Arkansas's membership in the United States. The diamond shape honors the United States' one and only diamond mine, while the 25 stars around it symbolize Arkansas's status as the 25th state to join the Union. The three stars below the word "Arkansas" represent the state's history as part of three different countries (Spain, France, and the United States) and its status as the third state to be created from the Louisiana Purchase. Adding the star above Arkansas in 1923 was a way to show support for the Confederacy. Some state flags are contentious, and so are some of the monuments they stand next to.

Flag of California GodRunar/Getty Images

Although officially adopted in 1911, the California state flag was first flown in 1846 as a symbol of rebellion against Mexico, which still ruled the state at the time. The grizzly bear, once common in California but now extinct there, was meant to strike fear into the hearts of Mexican officials. The "lone star of Texas," which the red star is supposed to resemble. Some Californians want a new flag to replace the one that has come to be associated with a rebellion led by "thieves, drunks, and murderers," as described in an editorial published in the Los Angeles Times. Grizzly bears are extinct in California, but this bizarre creature can be found in every single one of the 50 states.

This is the Colorado State Flag, waving in the wind situated on a flag pole. It is set against a blue sky. At the center of the flag is a large capital C. Photo by Joseph Sohm/Thinkstock

According to the Denver Channel, the blue in Colorado's state flag, adopted in 1911, represents the state's open blue skies, while the white stripe represents the snowcapped Rockies. State's red-hued earth is represented by the color red in the letter "C," which is the same color as the American flag. The golden "C" represents the state's abundance of sunny days. One of the 30 most commonly misunderstood facts about American states is that Colorado has many neighboring states.

National flag State of Connecticut on a flagpole Millenius/Shutterstock

It wasn't until 1895 that the state officially recognized the flag that had long been used to represent the Nutmeg State as the official Connecticut flag. Design elements include three grapevines, which stand for the original colonies that eventually merged to form Connecticut: New Haven, Saybrook, and Hartford. Colonel George Fenwick, who governed Saybrook at the time (1639), brought grape vines and the official seal from England to Connecticut. Fenwick's seal also features the Latin phrase "Qui Transtulit Sustinet," which translates to "He Who Transplanted Still Sustains." However, a Native American word is to be credited with the state's name. Many state names were likely influenced by Native Americans. In this manner, each of the fifty American states was given its name.

Delaware (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition image: railway fx/Shutterstock

According to the official website of the State of Delaware, the colors buff and colonial blue on the state flag represent those of a uniform worn by General George Washington. The date of Delaware's ratification of the federal Constitution can be found below the diamond (December 7, 1787). Due to its status as the first state admitted to the Union, Delaware is often referred to as the "First State." Some of the most humorous-sounding street names in the country can be found in the state of Delaware.

Florida (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition freight train/Shutterstock

According to the Florida Department of State, Florida was the first southern state to adopt a flag after the Civil War, and that flag went through several variations before arriving at its current form in 1900. The state emblem is featured in the middle of a St. The only blue in the flag is on the skirt of the Native American woman who is shown scattering flowers; it is a St. Andrew's cross, similar to the one on the Confederate flag. The earliest known burials of Tolomato tribe members are in a cemetery in Florida, one of the oldest in the United States.

Georgia (U.S. state) flag waving against clean blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency with black and white matte photo: railway fx/Shutterstock

Since 2001, Georgia has gone through three different state flags due to debates over how much of a connection to the Confederate flag there should be. The current flag, adopted in 2004 after a statewide vote, is still based on the Confederate flag's red, white, and blue "stars and bars," but it no longer features a St. Andrew's cross (in the manner of the Confederate flag)

Hawaii Waving Flag memodji/Shutterstock

A combination of the American "Stars and Stripes" in red, white, and blue and the British Union Jack in red, white, and blue forms the official flag of Hawaii. However, the personal flag of King Kamehameha I is also widely recognized as the official flag of Hawaii. Its tricolor design of royal red, landed gentry yellow, and commoner green represents the three social classes that make up Hawaiian society.

State Flag of Idaho Photo by Joseph Sohm/Thinkstock

The state flag of Idaho is blue with gold lettering reading "State of Idaho" below the state seal. The seal was designed after a painting by Paul Evans, and it features elements from the state's three primary economic sectors: mining, agriculture, and forestry. It's no surprise that Idaho has a few key economic sectors, but these lesser-known facts about every state are truly shocking.

Illinois (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition freight train/Shutterstock

At first glance, the Illinois state flag's design of the state seal on a white field with the state's name written in black below it may seem uncomplicated. The state motto "State Sovereignty, National Union" is displayed on a red banner held by the bald eagle on the seal. In 1867, Secretary of State Sharon Tyndale argued that switching the phrases around would show more support for the Union during Reconstruction, but the state Senate ultimately rejected her proposal. However, he did invert the word "sovereignty" so that it read "sovereignty" upside down.

Indiana (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition transport fx/Shutterstock

Indiana was the 19th state to join the United States, so its flag is blue with 19 stars, a torch representing freedom and light, and rays representing the state's far-reaching impact. Check out the weirdest mysteries that can't be explained in every US state.

Iowa (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition transport fx/Shutterstock

When state troops were stationed on the Mexican border during World War I, it was noticed that the Hawkeye State didn't have its own flag; this brought about the adoption of an official flag in 1921, nearly 75 years after Iowa's admission to the Union. The flag has the colors blue, white, and red in a vertical arrangement (like the French flag), with a bald eagle on the white stripe holding a blue streamer with the state motto "Our Liberties We Prize, and Our Rights We Will Maintain." Discover the significance of each state's motto after studying their flags.

Kansas (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition stock footage of a train ride courtesy of railway fx

The Kansas state flag has a blue background with the Kansas state seal, a golden sunflower, and the word "Kansas" in white lettering. Kansas was purchased from France as part of the Louisiana Purchase, which is represented by the gold and blue bar between the sunflower and the seal.

Kentucky Waving Flag memodji/Shutterstock

Adopted in 1918, the flag of the Bluegrass State features the state seal in the center of a navy blue field and was designed by a teacher of art. State law in Kentucky mandates that the seal depict both a frontiersman in buckskin and a statesman in a suit. The embrace between these two men has gone through many incarnations over the years, from two men in suits to two men in buckskin. There's a wreath made out of goldenrod (Kentucky's state flower) and the words "Commonwealth of Kentucky" on the seal as well. Can you name the only letter of the alphabet that does not appear in the name of a state in the United States?

State Flag of Louisiana Photograph: Joseph Sohm/Shutterstock

Louisiana's flag, which is blue and features an angular pelican tearing its breast to feed its young its own flesh and blood, is meant to symbolize the state's willingness to sacrifice itself for its citizens. Laws requiring the display of three blood drops went into effect in 2006. Seeing the state's most significant historical site is a great way to learn about Louisiana and other places.

State Flag of Maine Photograph by Joseph Sohm / Shutterstock

The current flag was adopted in 1909, and it depicts the Maine state seal, which depicts a farmer with a scythe, a sailor with an anchor, and a moose under a pine tree, with a banner reading "dirigo," which is Latin for "I lead." We use the present tense because there is a current in the state government to restore the flag from 1901-1909, when it featured a blue star and a green pine tree. Hold tight...

The flag of the state of Maryland against blue sky Shot by Chris Parypa for Shutterstock

"The perfect state flag," as described by Maryland's Secretary of State, has "bold colors, interesting patterns, and correct heraldry." The pattern is based on George Calvert's (the first Lord Baltimore and colonial proprietor of Maryland) coat of arms, with the red and white colors and the symbolic cross of his maternal family, the Crosslands, appearing at regular intervals. Here's the weirdest information about Maryland (and the rest of the states) you won't want to miss.

Massachusetts (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition photo: railway fx/Shutterstock

Massachusetts' flag, like Oregon's, is double-sided. On the front, a Native American is depicted beneath a disembodied sword-wielding arm, and the words "By the Sword We Seek Peace, but Peace Only Under Liberty" are written. The Bay State was one of the original 13 colonies, as indicated by the single white star. In the eyes of some, the symbols represent the centuries-long mistreatment of Native Americans, and thus cause them distress. Therefore, there is a proposal to alter the flag's design in Massachusetts.

Michigan (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition image: railway fx/Shutterstock

The blue flag of Michigan bears the state's coat of arms, which features an eagle holding an olive branch and arrows, as well as elk and moose supporting a shield with a man on a grassy peninsula. Flag mottoes include "From many, one" (E Pluribus Unum), "I will defend," and "If you seek a pleasant peninsula, look about you," (Si Quaeris Peninsulam Amoenam Circumspice). Every state, including Michigan's, has at least one cute, quaint little town.

Minnesota (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition freight train/Shutterstock

Fort Snelling was founded in 1819; Minnesota was admitted to the Union as a state in 1858; and the current state flag was adopted in 1893. Moreover, the 19 stars represent the fact that Minnesota was the 19th state admitted to the Union (following the original 13 colonies). According to the Minnesota Secretary of State, "The largest star represents the North Star and Minnesota."

COLLEGE FOOTBALL: NOV 14 South Carolina at Ole Miss Pics.Icon Sportswire/Getty Images

In 2020, Mississippi officially adopted a new state flag that removed the Confederate battle emblem. (Although Alabama's large distinctive X on its flag continues to spark debate, it was the last state whose flag still featured the emblem.) In 2020 on June 29 the Mississippi state legislature voted to replace the state flag, which had been in use since 1894. The governor, Tate Reeves, called the vote a "solemn occasion to lead our Mississippi family to come together to be reconciled." Voters in Mississippi's statewide election on November 3 ratified a new flag design featuring a magnolia blossom with the words "In God We Trust," 20 white stars to represent the state's status as the 20th state in the union, and a larger gold star to honor the state's Indigenous people. Take a look at these Native American-related tidbits you probably didn't learn in class.

Missouri (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition photos of trains/Shutterstock

According to the Missouri Secretary of State, who also explains: The blue stripe represents vigilance, permanence, and justice; the red stripe symbolizes valor; and the white stripe represents purity, Missouri went nearly a century without an official flag after becoming a state. Grizzly bears, representing "the size and strength of the state and the courage of her people," and a new crescent moon, representing the possibility of improving the future, are depicted on the state seal. With its status as the 24th state admitted to the Union, Missouri's coat of arms was surrounded by 24 stars. Last but not least, the flag has two mottos on it: "United We Stand, Divided We Fall" and the Latin phrase "Let the welfare of the people be the supreme law." Route66, which includes some of the most outlandish roadside attractions in the country, passes through Missouri.

State Flag of Montana Photograph by Joseph Sohm / Thinkstock

Montana's state flag could also be used as a promotional banner for trips to "Big Sky Country." The state seal, which features a mountain range, a waterfall, a forest, and a golden sun, is prominently displayed on the item. To put it simply, "gold and silver" is what the state motto on the seal says in Spanish. The top free tourist spots in each state are not to be missed.

Nebraska Waving Flag memodji/Shutterstock

The state seal of Nebraska, which features several Cornhusker State symbols, is depicted on the state flag. You can see a steamboat on the Missouri River and a train heading west toward the Rocky Mountains in the background. A blacksmith at work with his hammer and anvil represents the mechanical arts, while a settler's cabin, sheaves of wheat, and stalks of corn stand in for the agricultural sector. Equality Before the Law, the state motto, is displayed on a banner above the seal. While Nebraska is often overlooked, its residents have earned recognition for having the highest high school graduation rates in the nation. Here are the best and worst aspects of each of the 50 states, from Nebraska's high graduation rate to their high road rage rate.

Nevada (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition stock footage of a railroad/fx

The flag of Nevada has undergone several changes since its inception in 1905, when it proudly displayed the words "Silver Nevada Gold" alongside 36 stars to represent Nevada's status as the 36th state of the United States. The current version is much more subdued, with a silver star (Nevada's state metal) in the center of a wreath formed by two sprays of sagebrush (the state flower of Nevada), and the word "Nevada" placed underneath the star.

New Hampshire (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition freight train/Shutterstock

The frigate Raleigh, constructed in Portsmouth in 1776, is featured on the current New Hampshire state flag. As depicted on the seal, she was the first U.S. Navy ship to sail under the American flag in combat. New Hampshire was the ninth state to join the Union, so the ship is decorated with laurel leaves and nine stars. What is prohibited in New Hampshire (and elsewhere) might surprise you.

Flag of New Jersey in front of New Jersey State House, Trenton, New Jersey, USA. Images by Wangkun Jia/Shutterstock

The original Garden State flag's colors, buff and New Jersey blue, were selected by George Washington himself. The state seal, which consists of five individual symbols, is featured on the flag. Since New Jersey was the third state to sign the United States Constitution, the combination of the helmet and the horse's head serves to symbolize the state's early founding status. S Constitution Liberty, holding a staff with a liberty cap, and Ceres, the Roman goddess of grain, hold the shield above their heads. Ceres's cornucopia is overflowing with the many fruits and vegetables grown in the state. Three rows of plows represent the state's agricultural industry, and they appear on the shield between the two women. One more is a scroll with the state's motto, "Liberty and Prosperity," and the year 1776, when New Jersey was admitted to the Union as the ninth state.

New Mexico Waving Flag memodji/Shutterstock

The flag of New Mexico was recently voted the best in the country by the North American Vexillological Association, and it's not hard to see why with its bold colors and simple yet powerful Zia symbol. According to legend, the Zia sun sign originated at New Mexico's Zia Pueblo, and it symbolizes the four winds, four seasons, four cardinal directions, and four sacred responsibilities that each person must fulfill in order to complete the Circle of Life. While the state's introduction of the Native American symbol is not without controversy, the tribe now only asks that their ancient symbol be treated with reverence.

Flag of New York State in blue sky background Image by Wangkun Jia/Shutterstock

New York's seal, depicting two ships sailing down a river (likely the Hudson), with three mountains in the distance and a golden sun floating in a blue sky, is featured on the state flag. Liberty (on the left) is depicted with a Liberty cap and a staff, and Justice (on the right) is shown blindfolded and holding her scales, both of which flank the shield. Each person in the pair stands for the ideals expressed in the Pledge of Allegiance: "Liberty and Justice for all." The American eagle, facing west, perches atop a globe above the shield to represent New York's global significance, hope, and opportunity. Below the shield is a banner with the state motto, "Excelsior," which translates to "Ever Upward."

North Carolina Flag Featured image by Konstantin L/Shutterstock

The North Carolina state flag is graphic and uncomplicated. In addition to the colors and state's initials, the flag also features two dates. The Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence, in which residents of the county declared themselves "free and independent people," was signed on May 20, 1775; however, the authenticity of this document has been questioned. The Halifax Resolves were passed on April 12, 1776. providing permission for North Carolina's Continental Congress delegates to support independence

North Dakota (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition images of trains from railway fx/Shutterstock

North Dakota's flag includes several symbols that are commonplace in American flags. The first depicts the American symbol of "peace through strength," the bald eagle, with an olive branch in one foot and a sheath of arrows in the other. There are 13 stars on the eagle's breast, representing the original 13 states, and 13 stars above the bird, also representing the original 13 states. The national motto, "E Pluburus Unum," is displayed in the eagle's beak on the U.S. S currency Interesting fact: the bald eagle, which had been nearly wiped out, is now thriving in North Dakota.

Ohio (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition freight train/Shutterstock

According to John Eisenmann, who designed the Ohio state flag in 1901, the burgee-shaped flag is the only one in the United States that is not a rectangle. Hills and valleys are represented by the flag's triangles, while roads and rivers are shown by the flag's stripes. The Buckeye State is symbolized by the circle, which also represents the Northwest Territory and the first letter of the state's name. There are 13 stars to the left of the circle, representing the original states, and 4 stars to the right, representing Ohio, the 17th state.

National flag State of Oklahoma on a flagpole Millenius/Shutterstock

There is a peace symbol in the Oklahoma state flag in the form of an Osage warrior's shield with an olive branch and a peace pipe laid across it. However, the shield also indicates that Oklahoma is ready to defend itself if threatened. Louise Funk Fluke, known as the "Betsy Ross of Oklahoma," designed and had the flag adopted in 1925; the state name was not added until 1941, however. On the best rollercoasters in every state's best amusement park, you'll be heard yelling, "Oklahoma!"

Oregon (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition stock footage of a train ride courtesy of railway fx

Only two other states, including Oregon, have flags that are both double-sided. The state seal depicts a covered wagon and pine trees in front of a mountain on one side, and a British man-of-war ship leaving and an American steamer ship arriving via the Pacific Ocean on the other. There is a banner reading "The Union" in the middle, and below that are a sheaf, a plow, and a pickaxe. The flag of Oregon features a beaver, a proud emblem of the state's beaver-trapping and -trading past.

Pennsylvania (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition photos of trains/Shutterstock

Our second state's rich heritage is represented on the Pennsylvania flag. These include a ship-shaped shield, representing the widespread distribution of Keystone State products, a red clay plow, representing the state's abundant natural resources, and three golden sheaves of wheat, "suggesting fertile fields and Pennsylvania's wealth of human thought and action." To quote the official tourism site for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, The shield is supported by two draft horses, and an eagle perches atop it. "Virtue, Liberty, and Independence" is what the banner proclaims. ”

State Flag of Rhode Island Photography by Joseph Sohm/Thinkstock

Rhode Island's flag is white with a gold anchor and 13 gold stars, which stand for the original 13 colonies and states. A blue ribbon emblazoned with the state's motto, "HOPE," hangs below the anchor. Rhode Island is a major port, so an anchor might seem to have double meaning here, but the combination of "HOPE" and an anchor suggests a biblical reference containing the phrase "hope we have as an anchor of the soul." As opposed to the most difficult to pronounce towns in each state, "HOPE" is simple to say.

South Carolina (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition photos of trains/Shutterstock

The South Carolina state flag is one of the most easily recognizable due to the bold symbols displayed in reverse on a blue that matches the uniforms worn by South Carolina military personnel during the Revolutionary War. South Carolina law states that "the Palmetto at the center symbolizes the heroic defense of the palmetto-log fort on Sullivan's Island against the British fleet on June 28, 1776." A crescent, representing the shape of a silver emblem worn on the hats of soldiers who fought in that battle, can be seen in the top left corner.

National flag State of South Dakota on a flagpole Millenius/Shutterstock

In order to fully appreciate the South Dakota state seal, you should examine the flag of that state in close detail. A smelting furnace and other mining equipment, a mountain range, a farmer at his plow, a herd of cattle, a cornfield, and a steamboat on a river are depicted in the black and white drawing. Moreover, the letters "South Dakota, The Mount Rushmore State" are arranged in a circle around the sun, representing the state's pride in being the site of Mount Rushmore. This is the racist history of Mount Rushmore that was left out of your schoolbooks.

Tennessee (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition train fx/Shutterstock

"The three stars are pure white...bound together by the endless circle of the blue field, the symbol being three bound together in one—an indissoluble trinity," said LeRoy Reeves, a member of the Tennessee infantry and the man responsible for designing Tennessee's flag. ”

Rippled State Flag of Texas Shot by David Lee/Thinkstock

The "lone star" design makes this American flag instantly recognizable. According to Texas Hill Country, the flag "symbolizes Texan solidarity in having declared independence from Mexico," and it was originally flown over the Republic of Texas. Additionally, the blue stripe represents loyalty, the white stripe represents purity, and the red stripe represents bravery.

Utah Waving Flag memodji/Shutterstock

Most prominent on the Utah state flag is a beehive, a symbol of industry and labor. The Beehive State is another moniker for this state. The current design of the flag dates back to 2011, but it resembles the one that has flown since 1913. However, Utah lawmakers are currently discussing whether to adopt a new flag, so stay tuned.

Vermont (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition stock footage of a railroad/fx

There's a red cow on the flag of the state known for its cheese and ice cream, so it's no surprise that the state's symbol is a cow. The state motto, "Freedom and Unity," and other symbols, including the Green Mountains, wheat sheaves (representing the agricultural industry), a deer's head, and pine trees, can be found on the Vermont flag as well. However, there is zero connection between cows and Vermont's coolest secret location, or any other state's coolest secret location.

Virginia (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition photos of trains/Shutterstock

Virginia's state flag was officially adopted in 1861, the year the state seceded from the Union on the eve of the Civil War. The state seal of Virginia, depicting the goddess Virtus holding a spear pointing downward and a sword pointing upward, is featured on the flag of Virginia, which is a brilliant shade of blue. As a symbol of tyranny, she is perched atop a man, his crown lying to one side. Virginia's motto, "Sic Semper Tyrranis," appears alongside the state's name. ”

State Flag of Washington Photograph by Joseph Sohm / Shutterstock

The dark green of Washington's state flag is distinctive, having been adopted in 1923, more than 30 years after the state was admitted to the Union. The state's seal, which prominently features a bust of George Washington, is located at the center.

West Virginia (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition train fx/Shutterstock

The West Virginia state flag features a rock with the statehood date of June 20, 1863 in the center, with two men—one a farmer and the other a miner—flying from either side to represent the state's two primary economic drivers. The state flag is red with the motto "Montani Semper Liberi" (Mountaineers Are Always Free) inscribed in white lettering. West Virginia's state flower, the rhododendron, forms a wreath around them.

Wisconsin (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition transport fx/Shutterstock

The state flag of Wisconsin, along with the state's coat of arms, is loaded with meaning. The shield is flanked by a sailor and a miner, who both work hard for their state. A pick and shovel represent the mining industry, a plow represents agriculture, an arm and hammer represent the state's artisans and laborers, and an anchor represents the maritime sector. The badger and the state motto "Forward" are displayed above the coat of arms. The words "Wisconsin" and "1848" (the year Wisconsin joined the Union) can also be found on the flag.

Wyoming (U.S. state) flag waving against clear blue sky, close up, isolated with clipping path mask alpha channel transparency, perfect for film, news, composition photos of trains/Shutterstock

The large buffalo, once considered the "monarch of the plains," is the most prominent feature on the Wyoming state flag. The state seal is shaped like a brand and is placed on the buffalo's side; it boasts of the state's status as the first in the United States. S the first country or territory to give women the vote A cloaked figure in the middle holds a banner reading "Equal Rights," and the two groups of men on either side stand for the livestock and mining industries, respectively. Here are 100 more interesting and fun facts for you to learn after you've finished learning about state flags.

First Appearance: November 20, 2020

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